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    2) President Jokowi to have a guest house in Papua: Minister
    3) Water an urgent need in Papua province
    4) Seven Points of Agreement to Resolve Tolikara Incident
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    1) Depopulation of Papuans Becomes Obvious
    Jayapura, Jubi – Human right activist Markus Haluk said the threat of Papuan population has became obvious. The population of indigenous Papuan begins to decrease while the number of non-Papua is drastically rising. It predicts the number of Papuan in 2030 would be 15% of total population in Papua comprising of 2,371,800 indigenous and 13,228,800 non-Papuans.
    Haluk said the change was very visible in Dr. Jim Elmslies’ research of West Papua demographical change. The research indicated the population in Papua in 1971 was 923,000 which comprising 887,000 indigenous and 36,000 non-Papuans. In 1990, it extremely changed. The number of Papuans was 1,215,827 while non-Papuans were 414,210 of total 1,630,107.
    Fifteen years later, in 2005, said Haluk, the number of Papuans and non-Papuans has become equal. Indigenous Papuans were 1,055,795 and non-Papuans are 1,087,694 of 2,646,489 of total population in Papua. In 2011, it became more surprising. The Papuans have become minorities on their own land. The number of indigenous was 1,700,000 compare with the number of non-Papuans that reached 1,980,000 of 3,680,000 of total population in Papua.
    This change then predicted that the number of indigenous Papuan would become 1,956,400 while the population of non-Papuan would become 4,743,600 in 2020 of 6,700,000 of total population in Papua. The number would continue to improve in 2030, that is the number of Papuan would turn 2,371,200 and non-Papuan would become 13,228,800 of 15,600,000 of total population in Papua.
    “The change of population number has extremely occurred though the number of birth was decreased. It was happening because none of leaders paying attention on this issue,” Haluk said in One-Day Seminar held by Foreign Affairs of Papua Central Highland Association of Indonesia (AMPTPI) and Student Executive Body of Jayapura Science and Technology University (BEM-USTJ) on Wednesday (29/7/2015).
    Meanwhile Yulianus Mabel who participated in the seminar said this change has become obvious. Poor health services towards indigenous Papuans and rapid access of non-Papuans to entry to Papua were highly influenced this change. “I hope the government could pay attention on this changing instead to regard this as regular circumstance. The government is much care about their own business and its counterparts than paying attention to the threat of the existence of indigenous Papuan,” he said. (Mawel Benny/rom)
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    2) President Jokowi to have a guest house in Papua: Minister

    Rabu, 29 Juli 2015 20:04 WIB
    Jakarta (ANTARA News) - A guest house will be built for Indonesian President Joko Widodo (Jokowi) in Papua to enable him to closely interact with the people in the countrys easternmost province, a minister stated.

    "A special team is in the process of deciding the exact location for the guest house," Coordinating Political, Legal and Security Affairs Minister Tedjo Edhy Purdijatno stated here on Wednesday.

    Speaking at a seminar themed, "the Voice of Papua" here, he remarked that the guest house will be used by the head of state for work and also as a place that will make him feel closer to the people of Papua.

    The request for the presidential guest house in Papua was originally put forth by the officials of the State Palace, taking into consideration that he could visit the province thrice or even four times a year, Tedjo affirmed.

    "The guest house will not be like the Bogor Palace. It need not be luxurious. The most important aspect to build the guest house is that the president can get closer to the people, and they can easily meet him there," he affirmed.

    When questioned about the presidents security, Tedjo explained that it will not be a problem as the Papuans love the head of state, and this was reflected by the high number of votes that he had received during the 2014 presidential election.

    "Mr. President has frequently visited Papua and has got closer to the local people. He has never felt threatened during his visit in the province," he remarked.

    The seminar on the Papuan issue was attended by former transportation minister Freddy Numberi and former Indonesian ambassador to the Philippines Johny Lumintang, among others.

    (Reported by Michael Siahaan/Uu.R013/INE/KR-BSR/A014)
    ——————————————————————
    3) Water an urgent need in Papua province
    Updated at 1:37 pm on 30 July 2015
    The Indonesian Red Cross Society says water is an urgent need for remote communities in the Papua region still suffering from a severe cold snap.
    The society is delivering aid to the hard to reach Lanny Jaya district after hail storms and extreme cold weather left nine people dead and killed a large number livestock.
    Thousands are in need of food and clean water as local sources are reportedly frozen or have been contaminated, and supplies of bottled water are unavailable in local markets.
    Affected villages are nestled in high mountains, and delivering aid is a major challenge, with Red Cross volunteers having to walk for three days to deliver supplies.
    So far 500 gallons of drinking water, as well as blankets and food have been delivered.
    ———————————————————————————-
    4) Seven Points of Agreement to Resolve Tolikara Incident
    Jayapura, Jubi – GIDI and Muslim communities at Tolikara agreed to resolve the last incident of 17 July 2015 at Karubaga, Tolikara Regency. Both sides also agreed to solve their problem alone without any intervention from others outside of Papua.
    Facilitating by Inter-religious Harmony Forum (FKUB) on Wednesday (29/7/2015), both sides have agree on seven points as reference of conflict resolution due to incident. Applied as witnesses of this agreement are Nahdatul Ulama Papua Province, Kingmi Church Synod and Papua Civil Community Association.
    Seven points of agreement are as following:
    “Agreement Between Muslims and Christians of Karubaga, Tolikara Regency”
    Today, on Wednesday of 29 July 2015, herewith the undersigned who are representing Muslim and Christian communities at Karubaga, Tolikara Regency stated their agreement that:
    1.Incident that occurred on the celebration of Eid al-Fitr on Friday, 17 July 2015 in Tolikara Regency is not a religious conflict but only ‘miscommunication’ between both parties and we express our condolence at the lost of both life and goods.
    2.We sincerely forgive each other.
    3.We agree to go through the customary law in order to end the dispute and ask both parties to must end the legal process.
    4.We agree to rebuild the Musholla (little mosque).
    5.We agree to review this agreement regularly and maintain the peace and harmony between both parties.
    6.We will mutually maintain, respect and appeal to the entire religious communities in Indonesia to keep respecting to both GIDI and Muslim communities to do prayer as usual.
    7.We call on government to guarantee the freedom of religion and faith practice as well as the freedom to build the worship house.
    The agreement is not only raised because of our anxiety, concern or fear but it was rooted in experience of peace and respectful between Christian and Muslim communities for decades at Karubaga, Tolikara Regency and our expectation of more peaceful and respectful life.
    Jayapura, 29 July 2015.
    We are the undersigned:
    1. Ustad Ali Mukhtar;
    2. Ustad Ali Usman;
    3. Rev. Nayus Wonda;
    4. Rev. Marthen Jingga;
    5. Rev. Imanuel B. Genongga
    Witnesses :
    1. Chairman of NU Papua Province, Dr. H. Tonny VM, Wanggai, MA;
    2. President of GIDI, the Rev. Dorman Wandikbo, S.Th;
    3. The Rev. Lipiyus Biniluk, M.Th
    (Victor Mambor/rom)

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    PUNKS FOR WEST PAPUA - OFFICIAL TRAILOR (2015)
    In June 2015, Jody Bartolo and his Sydney punk band DIGGERS WITH ATTITUDE started a nationwide serie...




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    FRIDAY, 31 JULY, 2015 | 11:34 WIB
    Badrodin Calls for Full Investigation into Tolikara Case

    TEMPO.COJakarta- Speaking during the job transfer ceremony for Papua and West Papua Police chiefs at National Police’s Headquarter on Friday, July 31, 2015, National Police chief Badrodin Haiti has called for full investigation into the Tolikara case.
    Badrodin also called for communication and persuasive approaches in solving the case to avoid conflict.
    Badrodin revealed that Police has initiated efforts to restore the condition in Tolikara. He added Police summoned four reverends to be questioned on Thursday, July 30, 2015. However, they failed to answer the summons.
    “The questioning will probably conducted on Monday [August 3, 20150,” Badrodin said.
    Earlier, Badrodin inaugurated Papua Police chief Brig. Gen. Paulus Waterpaw to succeed Insp. Gen. Yotje Mende who will be transferred to the National Police Headquarter. Previously Paulus served as West Papua Police chief. 
    The West Papua Police chief position will be filled by Brig. Gen. Royke Lumowa. Previously Royke served as a deputy at the Coordinating Political, Legal and Security Ministry. 
    MITRA TARIGAN
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    2) Freeport’s Export Permit Extended  
    3) Papua’s first railroad  to connect Sorong-Manokwari - 

    4) Papua`s cultural events effectively attracting tourists

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    1) Discourse: Nationalizing  Freeport could be disastrous  for the economy - 
    The Jakarta Post | Discourse | Fri, July 31 2015, 2:27 PM - 
    The future of PT Freeport McMoran in Indonesia is hanging in the balance with the government refusing to negotiate the extension of its contract until 2019, two years before it will expire. The American gold mining giant, which operates the world’s largest gold mines in Papua, is lobbying to get the negotiations underway. Political analyst Ikrar Nusa Bhakti of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), who has done extensive research in Papua, talks to The Jakarta Post’s Safrin La Batu to discuss the future of Freeport. The following are excerpts from the interview.

    Question: What do you think of the growing demands for nationalizing Freeport?

    Answer: The majority of Freeport’s employees in almost all divisions are Indonesian; from the lowest to the highest positions. In fact, up to 98 percent of its employees are Indonesian. I was told that jobs with certain expertise, like explosive handling, are still handled by Filipinos because Indonesians are not as capable. 

    But the government has made Freeport use Indonesian-made detonators supplied by PT Pindad, the state-owned arms company. That seems like a fair deal. 

    The company also now buys its food and beverages from Indonesia rather than from Australia as it 
    did in the past. Some Indonesian workers have also been sent to work at Freeport’s other operations in Australia.

    But would nationalizing Freeport make sense to you?


    I would say that I am a nationalistic person, but I am also realistic. The mining industry is a lucrative sector. If our leaders, cabinet members, governors and local leaders are greedy and cannot control themselves, then nationalization will be counterproductive. 

    This was exactly what happened during the massive nationalization of Dutch companies in 1957. The impact for our economy was catastrophic, and lasted until 1971. There was mismanagement by army officers with little knowledge and skill who were entrusted to manage state-run companies. They didn’t have the international market networks.

    So, should we just forget about nationalization?

    Nationalization is possible, but it needs process and time. Before even thinking about it, we need to fix and strengthen the governance of state-owned companies and create a system that stops officials from working for their own personal gain.

    The government instead should focus on enforcing existing laws or come up with new ones that are more pro-people. 

    Do you think Freeport is doing enough to help with the economic development in Papua?

    Freeport can do more in helping to build infrastructure facilities. Infrastructure development in Papua, such as road construction, is not evenly distributed. Freeport has already helped build roads in the Mimika regency [where it operates], and it can help with the development in other parts of Papua like Merauke.

    Freeport says they have also contributed large sums for education in Papua. But how many schools have they built? How many Amungme people [the main tribe in Mimika] have benefited from this program? They should also help to bring the many tribes in the area, who are often in conflict with one another, together. Freeport needs to have peace and stability in the area to be able to operate.

    Is Freeport also responsible for fostering harmony in Papua?


    We have to question the results of Freeport’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs. They must have spent a huge sum, but where did the money go? 

    The people living in areas near its operation should get a proper education, not just material benefits.

    The recent Tolikara tragedy (communal conflict between Christian Papuans and migrant Muslims) was just the tip of an iceberg. The biggest problem in Papua is education, and the target is for all the people in the province, whether they live in the highland or the coastal areas, or whether they are indigenous Papuans or migrants, is learning to live in harmony. -

    ————————————————————————————-


    FRIDAY, 31 JULY, 2015 | 21:12 WIB
    2) Freeport’s Export Permit Extended  
    TEMPO.COJakarta - The government has officially extended Freeport's permit to export copper concentrate on Friday, July 31, 2015. Bambang Gatot Arianto, the director general of mineral and coal at the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry, said that the letter of permit extension had been signed by the Trade Minister.
    "It's official. Freeport's commitment has been realized," Bambang said on Friday, July 31, 2015 in Jakarta.
    The Energy and Mineral Resources issued the recommendation letter for Freeport's permit extension on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 allowing the giant mining company to export 775,000 tons of copper concentrate for next six months.
    Bambang explained that Freeport had met the requirement set by the Energy and Mineral Resources related to its smelter construction. Currently, the company's smelter construction in Gresik has progressed to 11 percent. Under Finance Ministry's Regulation Number 153/PMK.011/2014, Freeport is entitled to export duty reduction from 7.5 percent to five percent.
    Freeport has also paid its commitment fee under Energy and Mineral Resources Minister’s Regulation Number 11/2014, requiring the mining company to pay 60 percent of the total smelter construction cost on a semester basis to a government-owned bank. In the period of January-June 2015, the smelter construction cost in Gresik reached US$280 million.
    "We will continue to supervise the smelter construction," Bambang said.
    ROBBY IRFANY
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    3) Papua’s first railroad  to connect Sorong-Manokwari - 
    The National Development Planning Board (Bappenas) has announced that the first railway service in Papua will be the Sorong-Manokwari route in West Papua.
    Bappenas transportation director Bambang Prihartono also said that other routes are soon to follow, as the Ministry of Transportation is currently doing feasibility studies to decide which areas are suitable for railroad.
    “We are hoping that the feasibility studies will be wrapped up by the end of this year,” Bambang said in Jakarta as quoted by Antara news Agency.
    The project will accommodate both passenger and freight trains to increase connectivity in Papua, as well as supporting the planned development of industrial areas on the island.
    Bambang explained that the project will need years of preparation before physical construction can start. After the feasibility study is finished, the Ministry of Transportation will begin the detailed engineering design (DED); both phases have an estimated cost of around Rp 33 billion (US$ 2.4 million).
    The government is setting the target for physical construction to start as early as 2019.
    The railroad project is one of the infrastructure priorities set by the government to facilitate transport on all major islands in the country. The Transportation Ministry Directorate General of Railways earlier has estimated the cost of the projects to be around Rp 234 trillion. (rad)(++++
    ———————————————————————————————

    4) Papua`s cultural events effectively attracting tourists

    Jumat, 31 Juli 2015 15:33 WIB | 945 Views
    Jakarta (ANTARA News) - Annual events, such as the cultural festivals of Lake Sentani, Baliem Valley, and Humboldt Bay have proven effective in attracting both domestic and foreign tourists to Indonesias easternmost province of Papua.

    Increasingly more numbers of foreign tourists have shown profound interest in these cultural festivals and are visiting the province to enjoy its natural beauty and to gain firsthand information about the local culture.

    According to Mayor of Jayapura Benhur Tommy Mano, the number of tourist arrivals in Papua through the provincial city of Jayapura continues to increase every year. 

    He noted that the annual tourism and cultural events in Papua have served as a yearlong gateway for the tourism industry in the province.

    "In line with the several tourism events in Papua, the number of tourist arrivals has continued to increase during the past four years," Mano remarked in Jayapura on Thursday.

    He noted that the number of foreign tourist arrivals in Papua in 2014 comprised 7,268 foreign tourists and 66,137 domestic tourists.

    Mano further explained that the increase in the number of tourist arrivals was a result of the efforts made by the Jayapura Culture and Tourism Office to intensively promote the local tourism attractions.

    "In a bid to develop the tourism attractions in Papua and to make it a tourist destination in eastern Indonesia, the local authorities continue to work closely with the tourism ministry and other relevant institutions for holding the tourism events," Mano affirmed.

    He stated that the local authorities annually organize events such as the Humboldt Bay Festival, Baliem Valley Festival, and Lake Sentani Festival to promote the local culture and tourism attractions.

    Mano expressed optimism that the number of foreign tourist arrivals in Papua through the city of Jayapura will continue to increase until the cultural events kick off.

    In an effort to attract more tourists, Papua will host the Humboldt Bay Festival on August 5-7, which will be followed by the Baliem Valley Festival to be held on August 6-8, 2015.

    Scheduled to take place in Usilimo region in Jayawijaya district, the Baliem Valley Festival is usually enlivened by various fascinating art and cultural performances, including traditional Papuan dance performances, pig racing, Puradan Rattan Spear Throwing, Sikoko Spear games, and Papuan traditional musical performances, among several others.

    The festival will also feature a special Sege-throwing competition and an archery competition for foreign visitors as a mark of appreciation for attending the festival.

    The mayor of Jayapura stated that the Humboldt Bay Festival is part of the efforts to support Papua Governor Lukas Enembes program to make the province one of the key tourist destinations in eastern Indonesia.

    Mano also affirmed that the Humboldt Bay Festival will be synchronized and coordinated with the implementation of other events such as the festivals of Lake Sentani and Baliem Valley.

    "We will certainly create a calendar, which will include the agenda of the festivals in the regions that can be useful to the local and foreign tourists," the Jayapura mayor noted.

    In the meantime, Jayapura Culture and Tourism Office spokesman Bernard Fingkreuw has stated that the Humboldt Bay Festival will be organized in a bid to preserve Papuas unique and traditional arts.

    Known as the land of "Cendrawasih," or bird of paradise, Papua is truly blessed with an abundance of natural resources and unparalleled traditional arts and culture that must be maintained.

    "Whether it will be themed "Beautiful Numbay", "Beautiful Humboldt", or any other theme, the important aspect is that the festival should showcase the beauty of Humboldt Bay and feature various art and cultural activities and attractions," Fingkreuw remarked.

    According to the spokesman, the city administration of Jayapura has assigned an event organizer for the annual Humboldt Bay Festival.

    "We have appointed an event organizer to make preparations for the Humboldt Bay Festival this year. This is the first time that we have done it," Fingkreuw noted.

    He added that the event organizer was appointed to make the festival, which has been included in the national tourism calendar, more professional.

    "If the government organizes the festival again, it will be monotonous. However, with the event organizer, which includes creative people, the atmosphere of the festival will be different and even better this year," he affirmed.

    Further, he affirmed that the Humboldt Bay Festival in Jayapura will be supported by the Ministry of Tourism. 

    Jayapura city, known in the past as Hollandia, is located in Yos Sudarso Bay, which was earlier known as Humboldt Bay.

    American travelers to Jayapura will be interested to learn about the citys connection to the United States, and the role it played in World War II.

    Fingkreuw noted that the Humboldt Bay Festival was scheduled in early August to avoid overlapping with the Baliem Valley Cultural Festival in Wamena, which is held on August 9 every year.

    "We chose to hold the Humboldt Bay Festival early in the month of August, so that the visitors traveling to Wamena can stop over in Jayapura to attend the event," he explained.

    Therefore, Papua Governor Enembe emphasized that the Humboldt Bay Festival should be promoted widely and packaged carefully, so that it can generate revenue for the city of Jayapura.

    "This festival is unique and nice, as it will feature traditional dances, flute and drum performances, traditional menu cooking contest, hair weaving contest, and ornamental nut," he revealed.

    Enembe also stressed that if all aspects of this annual event are well-packaged by involving all stakeholders from the board of hotels and restaurants, travel agencies, and related businesses, then it will be able to attract several local and foreign tourists.

    (O001/INE)
    EDITED BY INE
    (O001/KR-BSR/F001) 

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    2) Top Spook Says Media Need to Be Kept in Check

    3) Civil Society Coalition to Hold Joint Prayer at Parliament’ Office


    4) Police Should Be Fair in Handling Misunderstanding at Tolikara
    5) Political Interests Involved in Tolikara Insident, Councilor Says

    —————————————————————————-


    The Extraordinary Tolikara Case
    Neles Tebay
     
    TEMPO English, Friday, 31 July, 2015 | 21:02 WIB

    TEMPO.COJakarta - On July 17, violence exploded in Karubaga, capital of Tolikara district in Papua province. Dozens of stalls and houses were set on fire, which spread to a nearby mosque. One youth was killed and 11 civilians were injured in the shootout that followed. Let us name this incident as the 'Tolikara Case'.

    Based on past experience, we noted a number of elements that deserve mention because they have never happened in the history of Papua, and according to our observation, the first time these things happened were in Tolikara.

    As far as we know, no violence has ever occurred in Papua during religious holidays, whatever the religion may be. Papuans respect the celebration of all religions. The violence that occurred about two weeks ago, when Muslims around the world were celebrating Eid of the Islamic year 1436, was the very first time that such an incident ever occured in the history of Papua. Therefore, Papuans are now asking: how can something so sacrilegious happen in Tolikara? This is incredible given that indigenous Papuans are totally against disrupting, let alone burning, sacred places, such as churches or mosques.

    Although the incident took place in a remote area that can only be reached by a small, single-engine airplane, the Tolikara Case attracted nationwide attention and reaction. The reaction came from a diverse range of people, from common citizens to the President himself, including all the religious organizations. But they came mostly from outside Papua. This is again amazing, because it is the first time in history that violence in the land of Papua has attracted so much attention.

    To Papuans, the violence at Tolikara is not the only one that has occurred on this land; our history is marked by a variety of violent happenings. Papuans have gone through different kinds of conflicts, during which many people have been killed. Right up to today, violence continues to happen. As a result, Papua has become synonymous with conflict. Even so, Papuans have never seen the tremendous reaction to what happened at Tolikara.

    Compare Tolikara with the time when four young men were shot dead and 18 other civilians suffered gunshot wounds, on December 8, last year at Enarotali, capital of Paniai district. The case remains unresolved. Many in Papua reacted strongly to this act of violence, but little was heard about it outside of Papua. We concluded it was not because people refused to express solidarity with the victims, who are fellow Indonesian citizens, but because the shooting incident itself was not publicly known.

    Conversely, the Tolikara incident attracted such wide attention as to warrant visits of high-ranking officials from both the Papua provincial administration as well as those from central government in Jakarta. Among them were the Papua Police Chief and and the Army Commander of Cenderawasih XVII battalion, followed by the ministers of home and social affairs.

    No one as important ever came when other incidents happened in Papua in the past. All these visits to Tolikara should be appreciated because they show sensitivity and a commitment to resolve the case comprehensively.

    Eight government institutions announced they will conduct investigations: the National Police, the National Commission on Human Rights, the Religious Affairs Ministry, Commission II of the House of Representatives (DPR), the Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI), the Indonesian Christian Student Movement (GMKI), the Tamir Masdjid Silahturrahmi Forum and Mushala Indonesia (Fahmi Tamami), and the Tolikara Papua People's Committee. Perhaps there are more, without publicly announcing it. Notably, they are all from outside of Papua. So far, no single institution in Papua has announced any plans to investigate the Tolikara incident.

    Admittedly, it is the only case of violence in Papua to be investigated by so many institutions. We highly appreciate the intention, because it indicates that all parties seek the truth in a transparent manner.

    The central government should take the initiative to coordinate the different investigations, seek differences in the findings and find a common ground for future reference. There should also be a shared commitment stating their willingness to accept the truth with a cool head and a calm heart.

    Hopefully, the investigation will englighten all parties to see the problem clearly, and gain a true understanding of what really happened in Tolikara.

    Neles Tebay:  Lecturer at the Fajar Timur Institute of Theological Philosophy at Abepura and coordinator of the Papua Peace Network.
    ——————————————————————————————————————

    2) Top Spook Says Media Need to Be Kept in Check
    Observer says BIN should be given authority to make arrests
    Jakarta. In the current era of easily accessible information, the Indonesian government needs to keep ‎an eye on the media, the recently appointed head of the State Intelligence Agency (BIN) said at a book launch on Thursday.
    BIN chief Sutiyoso explained that because everybody can find news everywhere these days, it is important to make sure no false information is being disseminated.
    “Media control is necessary so that there is no information bias,” said Sutiyoso, a retired general and former governor of Jakarta.
    The chief spook was speaking at the launch of a book written by his predecessor at the helm of BIN, Marciano Norman, on the role of state intelligence in Indonesia’s democratic consolidation.
    Sutiyoso said that in the current situation, one of the main challenges for the intelligence agency is that it remains very difficult to control the flow of information.
    ‘Toothless tiger’
    Also speaking at the book launch was Tjipta Lesmana, a political communication professor at Pelita Harapan University (UPH), who said BIN should get the authority to arrest people.
    “An intelligence agency without the authority to make arrests is like a toothless tiger,” Tjipta said. “I think BIN’s authority should be expanded.”
    The observer added that certain safeguards are needed to make sure agents cannot just arrest whoever they want, like in the days of the Suharto regime. But Tjipta also stressed that BIN’s operations should be as secretive as possible.
    “If it’s open, it’s not intelligence,” he said. “Look at the American CIA, they’re all around the world, working underground.”
    Foreign meddling in Papua
    Tjipta reportedly also criticized the decision by the administration of President Joko Widodo to allow foreign journalists to enter the restive Papua region.
    “In Tolikara there definitely was foreign [meddling], 1,000 percent,” he said, referring to a recent riot in the Papuan district during which dozens of stalls and a small mosque were burned down and a protester was killed after police opened fire. Eleven others were injured.
    The incident triggered fears of sectarian violence throughout the country.
    “Jokowi’s policy to allow foreign media into Papua is wrong, a big mistake,” the professor was quoted as saying by RMOL, a local news portal.
    “Foreign intelligence agents can enter with press IDs. Seriously, who are his advisers?”
    ———————————————————————

    3) Civil Society Coalition to Hold Joint Prayer at Parliament’ Office 

    Jayapura, Jubi – The Civil Society Coalition for Peace will conduct a joint prayer at Papua’s Parliament Office’s field on Friday (30/7/2015) at around 13:00 Papua time.
    Chairman of Kingmi Church Synod in Papua, the Rev. Benny Giay said the worship is part of series of resolution process between GIDI and Muslim communities at Tolikara, two weeks ago. Kingmi Church Synod invites some parties to participate in the event from both sides, Christian and Muslim communities.
    “The spirit to resolve the misunderstanding becomes our reference. People outside of Papua do not be provoked and take benefit on the dispute involving Muslim and GIDI communities in Tolikara for their interest. Do not make us as object for getting something. We are grateful that on Wednesday night (29/7/2015) both sides agreed to resolve that misunderstanding. We are Papuans, Muslims or Christians can resolve this problem,” the Rev. Benny Giay said when give the press conference at Kingmi Church Synod Office, Kota Jayapura on Thusday (30/7/2015).
    Coordinator of worship Dominggus Pigay said the coalition has sent an announcement letter to the Papua Police with a copy to Jayapura Municipal Police related to the event.
    “We will also send a letter to Papua Legislative Council for announcement. We have several agenda including theater performance on that occasion,” said Pigay.
    Meanwhile Nahdatul Ulama Papua Regional Board, Ustad Rasyid Mayang said religious leaders and stakeholders in Papua could solve this misunderstanding without having to involve the outsiders. He said they know the current situation in Papua than others.
    “This agreement indicates that religious communities and religious leaders in Papua could solve this problem. So, people live outside of Papua do not easily be provoked with the situation that they don’t know. Tolikara incident was an accident because of miscommunication,” Ustad Rasyid said. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)
    ————————————————-

    4) Police Should Be Fair in Handling Misunderstanding at Tolikara
    Jayapura, Jubi – An academic from Cenderawasih University, Marianus Yaung, urged the Papua Police to be fair in handling the conflict at Karubaga, Tolikara, two weeks ago.
    “I ask the Papua Police to investigate the witnesses both from the police and civilians, as well as to question GIDI leaders and highly respect the professionalism and principle of justice for every party. Do not make the impression there’s discrimination against GIDI leaders,” Yaung said when the Coalition of Civil Society for Peace in Tanah Papua held the press conference at Kingmi Church Synod Office in Jayapura City on Thursday (30/7/2015).
    According to him, those who are found guilty should be punished according to the Law and the shooting perpetrator against 12 civilians also must be revealed. He further said at that time civilians had no weapon.
    “It’s hard to find the projectile on the scene couldn’t be a reason. The Papua Police must uphold the principle of justice for both sides, Muslims and Christians. People in Papua are able to solve their own problem. They have local wisdoms to solve it,” he said.
    At the same place, the Chairman of the Alliance of Independent Journalist (AJI) Kota Jayapura, Victor Mambor said he highlighted more to media coverage when the misunderstanding was occurred in Tolikara.
    “Tolikara incident became a lesson. At that time, before doing clarification, media has published the news that likely triggered this misunderstanding to be a national issue,” said Mambor.
    Further, Mambor who is also the editor in chief of tabloidjubi.com and Koran Jubi also regretted the police’s act broadcasting the short message to the press and likely triggered the incident as a national issue.
    “At the end, we are all getting the impact. The police shouldn’t too rush to send the short message without verification. The sort message was forwarded from Papua Police Spokesperson, and we don’t know what the purpose is,” he said. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)
    ———————————————————
    5) Political Interests Involved in Tolikara Insident, Councilor Says
    Jayapura, Jubi – A deputy chairman of the Papua Legislative Council’s Commission I for Politics, Government, Foreign, Legal dan Human Right Affairs, Orwan Tolli Wone, said political interests were involved in the incident that occurred at Karubaga, Tolikara Regency two weeks ago.
    The councilor from the Tolikara electoral region said both sides need to concentrate on conflict resolution and that the incident had no connection with a particular religion.
    “It’s only a group of people who have an interest in local and national politics. I susect the incident involves both local and national issues. I can make this conclusion because for decades Muslims and Christians in Tolikara have lived in harmony. There’s never a problem. Why did it just happen right now?” Wone said on Thursday (30/7/2015).
    However, he also regretted the shooting over 12 civilians at that time. according to him, it shouldn’t be happened if the security forces are professional and could be persuasive in solving the problem.
    “The incident shouldn’t be happened. It’s happened because of lack of communication. The regent has made coordination with the local Police Chief but it was likely not well socialized among communities. The shooting incidents are always happened in several regions of Papua. Do not know whether it is an order or else,” he said.
    He affirmed at that time there’s no attack on Muslim communities who were at they prayer. According to him, if the attack was real, they must be injured hitting by stones or arrows and so on.
    “But I am disappointed because the media was also making the situation unclear. This problem cannot be drawn. All religious leaders and chairmen of religious institutions should sit together in taking the next step to solve this problem,” he said.
    Earlier, the Chairman of Human Right Investigation Team of Papua Legislative Council, Laurenzus Kadepa said he doubted the police could reveal the shooting perpetrator over 12 civilians at Karubaga. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)
    -----------------------------------

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    Tahiti Forum bid could trigger domino effect
    RNZI Updated at 6:44 am today
    An academic says there could be a domino effect of non-independent territories seeking to join the Pacific Islands Forum if French Polynesia achieves membership.
    The French territory, which currently has observer status at the Forum, is looking at increasing its involvement in the leading regional body.
    A Forum mission has recently been in Tahiti to assess its membership bid.
    The director of Massey University's Pasifika Centre, Malakai Koloamatangi, says while France is reluctant to entertain the idea of its territories becoming independent, it wants to engage more with the region and having Forum membership could help effect this.
    "If it works out for the French territories, who knows, American territories might follow suit if it's shown that joining the Forum in a more meaningful way might be more beneficial for them."

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    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1508/S00024/west-papua-must-be-raised-at-the-46th-pacific-islands-forum.htm

    West Papua must be raised at the 46th Pacific Islands Forum

    Open letter to Pacific Island Forum leaders - West Papua must be raised at the 46th Pacific Islands Forum Meeting.

    West Papua Action Auckland
    PO Box 68419
    Auckland
    New Zealand
    02 August 2015
    Re: West Papua must be raised at the 46th Pacific Islands Forum Meeting
    Dear Pacific Island Forum leaders,
    We are writing to you at a critical juncture for the people of West Papua and regional recognition of their struggle to end human rights violations in their land. 
    We call on you to extend your support by prioritising the human rights issues in West Papua at the 46th Pacific Island Forum (PIF) meeting to be held in September 2015 in Papua New Guinea.We urge you to advance the gains made at the recent Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG) Leaders Summit in Honiara, July 2015, where the historic decision was made to grant the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) Observer status in the MSG.
    Ongoing Human Rights Violations
    International and Indonesian human rights groups have regularly documented violence in West Papua, including the extensive use of intimidation, torture, sexual violence, beatings and killings by the security forces. The United States State Department 2014 Human Rights report on Indonesia exposes and condemns gross and persistent human rights violations by the Indonesian authorities in West Papua.
    Throughout last year, there were harsh crackdowns on numerous peaceful rallies. All sectors of society in West Papua including lawyers, human rights defenders, activists, clergy and journalists faced regular intimidation or the threat of arrest. The year ended with a shocking massacre of four school boys when on 8 December 2014 security forces fired into a crowd of approximately 800 peaceful demonstrators (including women and children) in Enarotali in the Panai regency. Despite international media coverage the perpetrators have not been brought to justice.
    This reality is all the more grim when one considers the fact that violent crimes committed by police and security forces are rarely punished. Indonesia is failing to address serious concerns regarding impunity for security forces. Amnesty International states: “Impunity for human rights violations is commonplace. Accountability mechanisms to deal with police abuse remain weak, and reports of torture by members of the security forces often go unchecked and unpunished.”
    Political prisoners languish in jail in West Papua for nothing more than raising the Papuan Morning Star flag or taking part in peaceful events. In August 2013, four leaders were arrested at a solidarity event in West Papua that included a prayer meeting and the display of the Morning Star, Aboriginal, and Torres Straits flags inside a church. On 1 May 2015 over 260 West Papuans were arrested by security forces for simply taking part in peaceful rallies in contravention of their right to freedom of expression and assembly. They were commemorating the 52nd anniversary of the administrative transfer of West Papua to Indonesia.
    West Papua is currently off limits to international journalists. Foreign journalists trying to report on West Papua have been arrested, deported and even imprisoned. While Indonesia's president Joko Widodo announced the end of the decades-long restriction on foreign journalists reporting on West Papua during a visit in May 2015, the President’s assurance has already been cast into doubt by contradictory statements made by members of his administration stating that foreign journalists would still have to apply for permits and would be subjected to screening.
    During the same visit to West Papua Indonesian President Joko Widodo announced the release of five political prisoners, under ‘clemency provisions’ which require them to admit guilt for their past actions. If the release of the five prisoners is to be seen as genuine progress, it must be followed by an increase in the rights and democratic freedoms of the Papuan people. Unfortunately there are signs that the opposite is happening.
    Indonesia’s Development Policy
    Indigenous West Papuans are now a minority in their land. From a large majority (96.09%) of the population in 1971, projected population figures for 2020 place West Papuans at 28.99% of the population, highlighting a rapidly changing demographic.

    The Indonesian government’s policy to accelerate development in West Papua policy is unlikely to bring peace or development. It is, in fact, likely worsening the human rights situation in West Papua and further marginalising West Papuan people economically, socially, politically and culturally.
    West Papuans must contend with the exploitation of their rich timber and mineral resources for which they receive little benefit. Large-scale mining and deforestation are causing massive social dislocation, devastation of rainforests and pollution of streams and rivers which people depend on to survive. The United National Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has written to the Indonesian government to express concern about the impacts of the planned large-scale Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate (MIFEE) project, which involves the conversion of a vast area of land, including forests, into plantations growing food, energy and other crops, on the indigenous peoples affected by this agro-industrial mega-project.
    Role of the Pacific Island Forum
    West Papua has always been considered part of the Pacific Community. Netherlands New Guinea, as West Papua used to be known, was a member of the South Pacific Commission (SPC), a forerunner of the PIF. West Papuans attended the SPC meetings until the Netherlands ceded its authority to the United Nations Temporary Executive Authority in 1962. From the time Indonesia took control of the territory in 1963, West Papua has been excluded from regional meetings. West Papuan leaders are turned down when they ask for observer status, but Indonesia is accepted as a ‘dialogue partner’
    However, some of the most significant efforts to inspire action to end human rights violations in West Papua have come from countries in the South Pacific region. Leaders of Nauru and Vanuatu spoke in support of self-determination for West Papua at the UN Millennium Summit in New York. Nauru also invited West Papuan representatives to be part of the official Nauru delegation at the 2000 PIF summit in Kiribati. Then president of Nauru, Mr Bernard Dowiyogo, declared, “[I]f the Forum is to continue to be relevant then it must confront such issues which are important to the lives and democratic rights of the people of our region.”
    Subsequent PIF meetings have included expressions of concern about the human rights situation in West Papua. However, in recent years the PIF has dropped the human rights situation in West Papua from its agenda and West Papua has not been mentioned in the official PIF Communiqué.
    Now, after over 53 years of political struggle for the right to self-determination, the ULMWP—the unified and recognised coordinating body representing West Papua with support throughout Tanah Papua—was granted Observer status by the 20th MSG Leaders summit in Honiara. It is noted that the Solomon Islands Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare, as chair of the Summit, played a significant role in ensuring this historic decision was made. This political recognition provides opportunity for West Papua to participate in regional dialogue with Indonesia for the first time in history. It is clear that this step was achieved through the increasing support from the people of the Melanesian countries, as well as those in the wider Pacific region and beyond.
    Currently, West Papuan leaders are committed to non-violent means to achieve their aspirations and to resolve problems and grievances. The PIF has proven itself to be an effective regional advocate. The forum—whose mandate is to promote regional stability—has a responsibility to help resolve this longstanding Pacific conflict.
    It is incumbent on the PIF to take substantive action. Specifically, we urge the leaders of the 46th PIF summit to:
    • Devote serious attention to West Papua’s deteriorating human rights situation and make reference to the on-going human rights abuses in West Papua in their annual communiqué.
    • Establish a regional Fact Finding Team to conduct a Human Rights Assessment in West Papua.
    • Support the call made by the former Prime Minister of Vanuatu, Moana Kalosil Carcasses at the 25th Session of the UN Human Rights Council in March 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland, for the UN to appoint a special representative to investigate alleged human rights abuses in West Papua.
    • Grant observer status to genuine representatives of the Melanesian people of West Papua, those who are struggling for their right to self-determination.
    We thank you in advance for acknowledging the rights and aspirations of the people of West Papua as a priority issue.
    Yours sincerely,
    Maire Leadbeater and Marni Gilbert
    West Papua Action Auckland
    Aotearoa New Zealand
    ------------------------------------------------

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    2) Government Uses Diplomatic Efforts to Approach OPM
    3) Indonesia Must Change Its Approach to Papua
    4) Villagers Suffer from Diarrhea Due to Contaminated Water
    5) Papuans Express Condolences on Death of Former Vanuatu Prime Minister
    6) Tanah Merah Bay Maritime Festival Celebrates Papuan Diversity
    ———————————————————————————————

    1) PAPUA TO SEND TEACHERS TO AUSTRALIA
    Jayapura, Jubi – Papua’s Department of Education and Culture in will send teachers and principals to participate in management training at the University of the Sunshine Coast of Australia.
    “This year there will definitely be teachers and principals who will take training management in Australia,” head of Education and Culture Department, Elias Wonda said in Jayapura on last week.
    He said the program is designed to meet the demands of high schools or vocational schools in each regency/city.
    “Teachers and principals will be sent gradually. The first cohort will be 30 people,” he added.
    He said before going to Australia, the teachers must take English lessons.
    “This program is a partnership with University of the Sunshine Coast of Australia and this program has been run from 2014 and will end in 2016, “he said.
    He added that this cooperation is designed to strengthen the capacity of elementary teachers in five regions including Jayapura, Mimika, Wamena and Merauke regions.
    “The training will be conducted twice and will be participated by 100 and 60 teachers for each, “said Wonda.
    Earlier, the Rector of the University of the Sunshine Coast of Australia, Greg Hill said University of Sunshine Coast focused on education because it is believed that education could bring progress and change particularly more emphasis on the development of the younger generation.
    Continued, University of the Sunshine Coast has brought many changes and it believes Cendrawasih University in Papua could do the same thing for its regions.
    “What we do is more emphasis on the quality of education in order eradicate illiterates. To that end, we hope the children will have a better ducation in order to bring changes for Papua and their families, “said Greg Hill. (Alexander Loen/Tina)
    ——————————————————————————

    2) Government Uses Diplomatic Efforts to Approach OPM


    Jakarta, Jubi – Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal, and Security Affairs Tedjo Edhy Purdijatno said the government is adopting a persuasive approach to deal with Free Papua Movement (OPM).
    “The government put forward a persuasive approach within the framework of development and welfare in order to deal with OPM, “said Tedjo, during a discussion entitled “Vote for Papua”  in Jakarta on last week.
    He said Indonesian authorities in Papua were actually exploring diplomatic efforts with groups who are seeking independence for Papua.
    “There are representative of Kemenkopolhukam and the Intelligence Agency State in Papua,” he said.
    In addition, President Joko Widodo has also urged for fighters hiding in the jungle and mountains in Papua to come out and join the government.
    “The president always encourages them to jointly develop Papua. However, it can not be forced upon them,” he said.
    The government will always give space to Papuans who want to come and express their opinions, he said.
    He said government welfare programs include national granary in Merauke, infrastructure, road construction, and plans to build a cement plant in Papua.
    Discussion on “Vote for Papua” was also attended by the Minister of Transportation Indonesia 2009-2011 period, Freddy Numberi and Indonesian Ambassador for the Philippines and former Military Commander VII / Trikora or now known as the Military Command XVII / Cendrawasih Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Johny Lumintang. (*/Tina)

    ———————————————————————————-
    3) Indonesia Must Change Its Approach to Papua
    Jayapura, Jubi –  The Coordinator for Legal, Politics, Human Rights and Foreign Affairs of the Papua Legislative Council, Laurenzus Kadepa said he was opposed to the Papua Police’s plan to summons three priests to be questioned as witnesses following the incident at Tolikara.
    Kadepa said the government should change its policies with regards to issues in Papua.
    ‘This is the time whereas the state must change its policies on development and approach to Papua. A policy that gives more priority to the principles of humanity is the one that’s been desired by Papuans,” Kadepa told Jubi through short message on Sunday afternoon (2/8/2015).
    According to him, the people of Papua do not trust the Country anymore for many Papuans were killed for being accused as Intruder Movement, Armed Criminal Group, or Free Papua Movement and so on.
    “Until now Papuans are still being treated unjustly. They are still stigmatized with various allegations; get wrong accused, being arrested without legal procedure, accused for the increase of crime. The declaration of the Unitary State of the Republic of Indonesia or Death  in Papua would be failed if the humanity crisis in Papua is continuing to increase,” he said.
    Meanwhile, Deputy Chairman of the Commission I of Papua Legislative Council, Orwan Tolli Wone said he’s afraid if the summon over these religious leaders would raise a polemic among Tolikara community.
    “I don’t agree if the Papua Police will call and question the president and other GIDI leaders. Do not make the local people to have another perception and give unexpected reaction. Do not let it become a polemic. Why are they being questioned but the shooting perpetrators are not. What is it mean?” Orwan Tollik Wone said at that time. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)
    ——————————————————————————-
    4) Villagers Suffer from Diarrhea Due to Contaminated Water
    Wamena, Jubi – Hailstorms that occurred in Lanny Jaya regency last month caused failure of crops, a shortage of food and water pollution, an official said.
    Regional Secretary of Lanny Jaya, Christian Sohilait,  explained that villlagers of Mume had stomach problems after drinking water from the river.
    “Villagers suffer from diarrhea from using unclean water from the river, “Sohilait said in Wamena on last week.
    Therefore, local government is scheduling to get a sample from the location for further investigation.
    “Right now we’re trying to take water samples from the site and take them to a laboratory in Jayapura. Yet because of limited time, we found difficulty to get sample, “he added
    According to one of residents in Kuyawage the contaminated water should have not been consumed by villagers because when there is a mixture of oil in the water.
    Currently Lanny Jaya government is sending doctors to Kuyawage, and gallons of water by using two aircraft flight for the villagers.
    ” Based on the latest data recorded that as many as 115 people in Goa Balim had diarrhea and 70 villagers in Mume, Kuyawage. We’ll find out why water can be contaminated, “Sohilait said. (Islami/Tina)
    —————————————————————————————-
    5) Papuans Express Condolences on Death of Former Vanuatu Prime Minister
    Jayapura, Jubi – The United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) expressed condolences over the death of former Vanuatu Prime Minister Edward Natapei.  
    The people of Papua held traditional mourning ritual at Maria’s cave in Buper Waena, Jayapura City on Saturday (1/8/2015) to express their sorrow over Natapei’s passing.
    “People of Papua today showed the mourn on their way. We should express it to people of Vanuatu,” the Secretary of Republic Federal of West Papua (NRFPB) Markus Haluk said.
    Spokesperson of West Papua National Parliament, Simeon Alua similarly said the people of Papua should express deep condolence over the former Vanuatu leader due to his merit towards political movement in Papua.
    “I express my condolence. He deserved a respect. He has also struggled for the fate of our nation until he died. He should get respect. He had fight for our nation abroad,” he said. (Mawel Benny/rom)

    ———————————————————————————-





    TUESDAY, 04 AUGUST, 2015 | 21:00 WIB
    6) Tanah Merah Bay Maritime Festival Celebrates Papuan Diversity
    TEMPO.COJakarta - Jayapura Regency's Administration will hold the inaugural Teluk Tanah Merah Maritime Festival between Octber 24-26, 2015. The Festival, which aims to promote the beauty of the coastal region, is designed to entice travellers into the region that has so far been overshadowed by Lake Sentani - the region's premier tourist destination. The event is set to be held annually - along with Lake Sentani Festival, which has been held every year since 2008. The festivities will be focused on Amai Beach, in Depapre District, where a variety of activities will be held, such as a diving competition, underwater photography competition, traditional boating competition, as well as a traditional dance festival that showcases dances native to the coastal region. 

    The Regent of Jayapura, Mathius Awoitauw, said that the festival aims to promote the natural and cultural diversity of the region by establishing it as a tourist destination. "As such, the local economy could grow because local residents could capitalise on their customs - which provides an incentive to preserve local customs and traditions," he said. Mathius added that the residents of the coastal area have customs that vary quite significantly compared to the customs of locals residing around Lake Sentani - which could be used as a selling point to attract tourists from all around the region. "Through this festival, we aim to showcase this diversity - both its' natural diversity, as well as its' cultural diversity," he said. In addition to Amai Beach, tourists could also explore the turquoise waters of Harlem Beach, which is known for its' sandy beach, accessible coral gardens mere metres from the break, as well as a fresh water pool some seven metres from the beach. Formed hundreds of years ago - the pool is a sanctuary for several species of fish, which cannot be found on the beach's salty waters. 
    Tablamusu Beach is also a gem that could be explored. Its' black corals emit a sound dissimilar to a cry of despair when stepped on; because of which, the nearby village is known as the Wailing Rock Village. History is also a selling point - it was on Tanah Merah Bay when the American fleet led by Gen. Douglas MacArthur first stepped foot on Papuan soil during World War II. The evidence of this encounter could still be seen - abandoned fuel tanks, cannons, shipwrecks, and bunkers litter the area, reminiscent of a time that has long since passed. The festival will be closed by a Bible ceremony on the Island of Metu Debi, where a dance - that tells the story of when the locals first began to embrace Christianity - will be performed. There are so much more to Papua than Lake Sentani - and the Tanah Merah Bay Maritime Festival, is a perfect starting point, to celebrate and explore the diversity of Papua.
    TEMPO TEAM
    ————————————————————

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  • 08/05/15--02:56: 'Tolikara incident
  • 'Tolikara incident








    On Friday the 17 July an incident occurred in Karubaga, the capital of Tolikara district resulting in about 60 kiosks and houses being burned. The fire also spread and burned a nearby small mosque.  One student was killed and 11 civilians were injured when the security forces opened fired to disperse a gathering of residents who according to first reports had attacked a group of Muslims who were about to perform Idul Fitri prayers to celebrate the end of the fasting month Ramadan.  The incident has received a large amount of media coverage in the local and national press over the past few weeks with dramatic headlines such as 'Extremists burn down mosque on Eid"






                        GIDI’s members were injured in hospital after the incident – Jubi (20 July)



    The incident is reported to have begun when a group from the Evangelical Church of Indonesia (GIDI) who were holding a conference in a nearby church had complained about the volume of the sound coming from a mosque’s loudspeakers. According to the police the crowd started throwing stones at Muslims performing their outdoor Eid al-Fitr prayers resulting in the worshippers fleeing to a nearby local military office for protection. The military claim they fired warning shots however, one student, Edi Wanimbo (15 years old) was killed and eleven people injured. 






    Security forces fired warning shots to disperse a crowd of about 200 after they disrupted an Islamic prayer meeting and attacked a mosque. (SP Photo/Robert Isodorus) Jakarta Globe 22 July

    Tempo reported (19/7) that the President of the GIDI, Rev. Dorman Wandikmbo, said the unrest was initially caused by the police shooting indiscriminately at residents who asked Muslims to practice Eid prayers without loudspeakers. Unhappy with the response some people got angry and burned kiosks with the fire accidentally spreading to the nearby mosque.  Natalius Pigai, a commissioner at the National Commission for Human Rights said that the conflict was also triggered by police shootings against Christians. “It seems to have been a misunderstanding that GIDI is being hostile to Islam. In fact, they were not planning to burn the mosque. People were upset because of the police shootings ”(Tempo 18/7). National police chief General Badrodin Haiti admitted that the police had opened fire in the incident in Tolikara.  “The victims were shot because they were pelting stones at Muslims who were just performing Eid prayers," he said after visiting Karubaga. General Badrodin Haiti said the police were still investigating the incident with regard to processing the case including the shooting and the torching incidents. At least 153 residents in Karubaga were evacuated to several tents set up at the Karubaga Military Headquarter on the Saturday The Papua Regional Police chief, Inspector General Yotje Mende, said the victims needed assistance, particularly clothes, since their belongings had all been razed by the fire.






    Religious leaders, both Muslim and Evangelical Churches in Indonesia (GIDI) made peace in the yard of the local military command, Karubaga City, Tolikara on Wednesday, July 22, 2015. (Tempo.co 23 July)

    In a Jubi report (20/7) The President of the GIDI, Rev. Dorman Wandikmbo said is not true that GIDI’s members forbid the celebration of Eid Mubarak for Muslims in Tolikara. He also denied that GIDI’s members had set a plan to burn a mushola during the incident. Rev. Wanimbo said, about three weeks before implementing the event, local church officials had issued a notification letter that had been approved and recognized by the local government, army and police. “When the day came, we were surprised that the police and army allowed worship to carried out in the field and using loudspeakers. We have already conveyed (our plans) in the letter,” he said. Therefore, GIDI’s members come to negotiate with Muslims who are preparing to run the Eid prayer. Negotiations had not started and suddenly one of the GIDI’s members was shot. 


    An extract from another report in Jubi (20/7).

    The Rev. Wanimbo further said on 17 July in the morning, the Muslim did the prayer in the Mushola’s yard and used the speaker. Due to this action, about 15 students came to the Mushola and asked them politely that they should be do prayer inside because the distance of Mushola and venue of seminar is only about 300 meters. It would give bad impression. “But our Muslim brothers were angry and there’s among them carrying a gun and shot a fire. Eventually everyone ran but some got shot. Finally, many people started to come including some guests and myself. But we pulled back because afraid of random bullets,” he said. At that time, Wandimbo said, the crowd scattered and became upset when seeing some have been shot. Their emotions were provoked and they burned the stall instead of mushola that was located in the centre of area. But because the stall was made by wood, the fire spread to resident’s houses and mushola where located behind the stall



    Another extract from an article in GIV News, Who Orchestrated the Tolikara Incident? suggests outside interference

    External Influence?

    All these uncertainties, combined with the loss of life and the fact that this unfortunate incident occurred on the usually highly tolerant Papua, has sparked the theory that the entire conflict was orchestrated by someone outside Papua. This perpetrator is believed to aim for chaos by causing sectarian conflicts in Papua, a region which has only recently started to improve its relationship with Jakarta, under the support and leadership of President Widodo.

    The strongest opinion so far came from Fahmi Habsyi, Executive Director of the Trisakti Evaluation Center (Pusaka Trisakti), who believed that what happened in Tolikara was purely an intelligence operation. Habsyi trusts that the Papuan people are tolerant and very polite, and thus the incident cannot be seen on its own. He also thinks that the attack may be related to Widodo’s policy of accelerating development in Papua.

    “The sequence [of events] must be seen from several one-sided actions which have demanded a referendum on Papua… Someone is trying to create trouble, and also offers the solution through another motive and aim for a compromise. This is a classic style. Hopefully [President Widodo] can see it. Do not underestimate the incident. Remember the riot in Ambon 1999, it was sparked by a mere fight in a terminal. What happened in Papua is more serious than that,” explained Habsyi to Berita Satu.

    Habsyi’s sentiment is echoed by Laode Ida, Chairman of the Presidium of East Indonesia Association (PPIT). “Violence towards a religious group is not the character of Papuans. The Papua people are not like that. They are tolerant and respectful of other people’s religious freedom. We strongly believe there are groups who come from outside Papua and then spread a provocative propaganda.” Ida also demanded the government to mediate a formal reconciliation process in Tolikara to prevent a cycle of revenge, as reported by Kompas.

    The possibility of an outsider whispering to the GIDI congregation has not escaped the attention of General Badrodin Haiti, head of the National Police. “Someone deliberately set the riot. However, we can’t confirm yet the existence of a foreign power in the incident. But there are several people from out of the region who were involved in the riot. We are still looking for the intellectual actor.”  http://www.globalindonesianvoices.com/21680/who-orchestrated-the-tolikara-incident/


    And in Jubi (31/7) 

     A deputy chairman of the Papua Legislative Council’s Commission I for Politics, Government, Foreign, Legal dan Human Right Affairs, Orwan Tolli Wone, said political interests were involved in the incident that occurred at Karubaga, Tolikara Regency two weeks ago. The councilor from the Tolikara electoral region said both sides need to concentrate on conflict resolution and that the incident had no connection with a particular religion. “It’s only a group of people who have an interest in local and national politics. I suspect the incident involves both local and national issues. I can make this conclusion because for decades Muslims and Christians in Tolikara have lived in harmony. There’s never a problem. Why did it just happen right now?” Wone said on Thursday (30/7/2015).



    Prosecution begins: AK (center), a suspect in last week’s Tolikara riot, arrives at the Jayapura Police headquarters in Papua, on Friday. The police have named two suspects involved in the violence that claimed one life, injured 12 and saw the burning down of a market and a small mosque. (Jakarta Post 25 July)


    The media including social media has come under some critism for their response in spreading news before clarification. The Chairman of the Alliance of Independent Journalist (AJI) Kota Jayapura, Victor Mambor said he highlighted more to media coverage when the misunderstanding was occurred in Tolikara. “Tolikara incident became a lesson. At that time, before doing clarification, media has published the news that likely triggered this misunderstanding to be a national issue,” said Mambor. Further, Mambor who is also the editor in chief of tabloidjubi.com and Koran Jubi also regretted the police’s act broadcasting the short message to the press and likely triggered the incident as a national issue. “At the end, we are all getting the impact. The police shouldn’t too rush to send the short message without verification. The sort message was forwarded from Papua Police Spokesperson, and we don’t know what the purpose is,” he said. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)


    Papua Youth Chairman, Ridwan al-Makassary said the Tolikara incident that occurred on 17 July 2015 has been wrongly interpreted by most media workers, as they didn’t apply journalistic standards. And when making coverage of such incident that was triggered by miscommunication between interreligious communities, a journalist is expected able to cover it with the perspective of peace journalism. “I see the peace journalism as foundation to get a solution at that point but didn’t executed by journalists,” said the lecturer of Jayapura Science and Technology University who spent most of his life from childhood in Serui during a dialogue ‘Peace Papua, Peace Indonesia’ held by national television station in Jayapura on Saturdary (1/8/2015).




    Jubi reported  (4/8) that the president of the Evangelical Church in Indonesia (GIDI) Rev. Dorman Wandikbo visited the Papua Police on Monday (3/8/2015) to be questioned over the incident in Tolikara. He was accompanied by several church leaders and about 30 GIDI congregation members and supporters. He was welcomed by the Chairman of the Papua Legislative Council who had previously been there.  “As a good citizen, today I came to meet the police’s call to convey what did I see and feel. Some church leaders and partisans wanted to come along with me.  Lawyers Gustaf Kawer, Olga Hamadi and Yan Warinussi will stand beside me as attorney,” Rev. Wandikbo said on the way to the police headquarter. After being questioned, the Rev. Dorman Wandikbo and his accompaniers returned to Kingmi Church Synod Office and interviewed only by Jubi.


    No reporters interviewed him but some of them interviewed his lawyers to get detail information on investigation. To Jubi, he said in addition to meet the summon, he had two points to be said to the police. “At first, to testify the chronology of Tolikara incident that killed a fifteen years old boy, Endi Wanimbo and injured eleven people and burned dozens of houses and a musholla. The second is to convey the result of agreement to resolve the dispute between GIDI and Muslim communities in Tolikara,” he told Jubi at Kingmi Church Synod Office after undergoing the investigation. Meanwhile, his attorney Gustaw Kawer said the President of GIDI was summoned to testify as a witness. “He was examined as a witness and being questioned with 37 queries for four hours,” said Kawer. (Victor Mambor/rom) http://tabloidjubi.com/en/2015/08/04/president-of-gidi-answers-police-summon/


    The Tolikara Police chief, Adj. Sr. Comr. Soeroso was reassigned 10 days after the incident.


    According to Neles Tebay (in an article in Tempo 31 July) eight government institutions announced they will conduct investigations into the incident, “ The National Police, the National Commission on Human Rights, the Religious Affairs Ministry, Commission II of the House of Representatives (DPR), the Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI), the Indonesian Christian Student Movement (GMKI), the Tamir Masdjid Silahturrahmi Forum and Mushala Indonesia (Fahmi Tamami), and the Tolikara Papua People’s Committee”. As Neles noted in the article they are all from outside of Papua.  It would appear that the media coverage and investigations into the 'Tolikara incident will be ongoing for some time. 


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    Australia West Papua Association (Sydney) 
    PO Box 28, Spit Junction, NSW 2088

    Summary of events in West Papua for July –(5 August)  2015


    Tolikara incident
    On Friday the 17 July an incident occurred in Karubaga, the capital of Tolikara district resulting in about 60 kiosks and houses being burned. The fire also spread and burned a nearby small mosque.  One student was killed and 11 civilians were injured when the security forces opened fired to disperse a gathering of residents who according to first reports had attacked a group of Muslims who were about to perform Idul Fitri prayers to celebrate the end of the fasting month Ramadan.  The incident has received a large amount of media coverage in the local and national press over the past few weeks with dramatic headlines such as “Extremists burn down mosque on Eid”. The incident is reported to have begun when a group from the Evangelical Church of Indonesia (GIDI) who were holding a conference in a nearby church had complained about the volume of the sound coming from a mosque’s loudspeakers. According to the police the crowd started throwing stones at Muslims performing their outdoor Eid al-Fitr prayers resulting in the worshippers fleeing to a nearby local military office for protection. The military claim they fired warning shots however, one student, Edi Wanimbo (15 years old) was killed and eleven people injured. Full report at http://awpasydneynews.blogspot.com.au/2015/08/tolikara-incident.html


    Police Raid KNPB Merauke Office, Arrest Chairman
    Yogyakarta, Jubi – Dozens police officers came to KNPB and PRD secretariat at around and arrested Merauke KNPB Chairman Gento Emerikus. A witness who decline to be named told Jubi about 15 minutes before the police arrived, some special army forces were seen passing through KNPB and PRD secretariat on motorcycle. Then at around 11:00 Papua time, Merauke Police led by Marthin Kuagouw came to the secretariat with the police’s truck and motorcycles. “KNPB and PRD had no specific activities when the police came and raided the secretariat shouting them to disperse and go home, but Gento Emerikus said he’s the responsible one. The police straightly,” he said on monday (3/8/2015). He further said at that time, KNPB and PRD activists were at secretariat. They used to be gathered and stay there everyday eventhough there’s no specific activities.“The police said ‘all of you are gathering to plan a boycott on the anniversary of Indonesian Independence Day 17 August 2015’. The fact is we were not in a meeting or planning something. Then Police Operation Head told us to stop gathering. ‘If you keep to do so, we will come with the army to disperse you with stricter action,” he cited the head. He explained when the special army forced passed through their secretariat, the police sent a short message to KNPB Chairman asking what did they have a meeting? His said no but the police still came at noon. Meanwhile the Central KNPB spokesperson Bazoka Logo when confirmed by Jubi said he regretted the police’s act in Merauke Regency. He said the police in Merauke must learn about the Law because they acted as same as uneducated people. “Do not think we would be afraid of their old fashioned acts. On the other hand we feel grateful because the Police is helping us to accelerate our struggle with act like uneducated people against us Papuans,” he said. He further said the professionalism and credibility of both Merauke Police Chief and Merauke Police Operation Head should be questioned as they acted violating the procedure due to the raid and arrest. “Currently KNPB and PRD had no activities but the police raided and arrested the KNPB Chairman. It’s very ashamed because there’s no activities conducted today. This country is very weird and messy. It had no idea how to apply their own law,” he said. (Arnold Belau/rom)


    Thousands go hungry as freak cold wave hits Papua
    International federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies 29 
    July 2015 By Ahmad Husein, IFRC
    In recent weeks, thousands of people in the Indonesian Province of Papua have been suffering the effects of a severe cold wave that has left remote communities in need of food and clean water. The cold wave first struck at the beginning of July, hitting the district of Lanny Jaya particularly hard. The sub-districts of Kuyawage, West Wanu and Goa Baliem were struck by hailstorms accompanied by freezing temperatures which plunged to minus two degrees Celsius. "Water is an urgent need for the communities in Lanny Jaya,” said the Executive Chairman of the Indonesian Red Cross Society, Ginandjar Kartasasmita. Local water sources are reportedly frozen or have been contaminated and supplies of bottled water are unavailable in local markets. In response, the Red Cross has so far distributed 500 gallons of drinking water, blankets and instant food to help 182,000 people who are in need of humanitarian assistance. All aid items have been decided following a rapid assessment carried out by the Red Cross in coordination with local authorities which have distributed five tonnes of rice to Kuyawage and deployed two doctors and five nurses. The average temperature in Lanny Jaya ranges between 17.8 degrees to 32 degrees and such an extreme cold wave hasn’t been witnessed since 1989. So far, nine people have died, half of whom were children. Hundreds of people are suffering from health problems while thousands are threatened with food shortages. The hailstorms caused severe damage to farmland and killed a large number of livestock. “Our community has suffered as the hailstorms destroyed yam crops and people have nothing to harvest. It also killed 168 pigs which are our main livestock,” said Lenius Muria Lanny, head of Kuyawage sub-district. Delivering aid to the region is a major challenge. Affected villages are nestled high in the mountains and to reach them, Red Cross volunteers walked for three days with supplies as the unstable weather has hampered efforts to send materials by small aircraft which is normally the only form of transportation that can be relied upon.   According to the Indonesian Agency for Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysics (BMKG) the cold wave with accompanying hailstorms is a climatic event that could be attributed to El Niño which typically brings colder than normal temperatures to the far eastern Pacific during the June-August and September-November seasons.


    East Timor’s former president Jose Ramos Horta says West Papua ‘part of Indonesia’ 
    ABC News 23 July 2015
    East Timor’s former president, Jose Ramos Horta, says that he does not think an independence campaign for the Indonesian province of West Papua will be successful. "I don't believe in that," the now United Nations special representative told the ABC. "Well everything is possible in the world," he added, "but I wouldn't advocate that.  "It is very much a part of the Republic of Indonesia. "Solutions for the betterment of the people of West Papua, ending any human rights abuses, economic, social exclusion of West Papuans have to be realised in the context of Indonesian sovereignty."  Mr Ramos Horta's comments go against the calls of West Papua's pro-independence supporters who seek to separate the region from Indonesia. East Timor struggled for decades for its own independence which it achieved in 2002. "I believe that if anyone can help redressing the challenges and problems in West Papua would be [Indonesia's] president Widodo," Mr Ramos Horta said. "I would urge West Papuan elites to seize on the opportunity with a new president to find the best possible arrangement between Jakarta and West Papua." Meanwhile, Mr Ramos-Horta said he believed the relationship between Australia and East Timor was good but stressed there were differences when it came to the neighbouring countries' borders. "Canberra, in a very simple manner, would like to see Timor Leste forgetting about wanting to have a maritime boundary," he said. "Any international attempt at litigation, at arbitration could end today if Canberra were to signal to Timor Leste that let's sit and settle the maritime boundary, let's draw a median line."


    Top Spook Says Media Need to Be Kept in Check
    Observer says BIN should be given authority to make arrests 
     Jakarta Globe  Jul 30, 2015
    Jakarta. In the current era of easily accessible information, the Indonesian government needs to keep ‎an eye on the media, the recently appointed head of the State Intelligence Agency (BIN) said at a book launch on Thursday. BIN chief Sutiyoso explained that because everybody can find news everywhere these days, it is important to make sure no false information is being disseminated. “Media control is necessary so that there is no information bias,” said Sutiyoso, a retired general and former governor of Jakarta. The chief spook was speaking at the launch of a book written by his predecessor at the helm of BIN, Marciano Norman, on the role of state intelligence in Indonesia’s democratic consolidation. Sutiyoso said that in the current situation, one of the main challenges for the intelligence agency is that it remains very difficult to control the flow of information.

    ‘Toothless tiger’ Also speaking at the book launch was Tjipta Lesmana, a political communication professor at Pelita Harapan University (UPH), who said BIN should get the authority to arrest people. “An intelligence agency without the authority to make arrests is like a toothless tiger,” Tjipta said. “I think BIN’s authority should be expanded.” The observer added that certain safeguards are needed to make sure agents cannot just arrest whoever they want, like in the days of the Suharto regime. But Tjipta also stressed that BIN’s operations should be as secretive as possible. “If it’s open, it’s not intelligence,” he said. “Look at the American CIA, they’re all around the world, working underground.”

    Foreign meddling in Papua Tjipta reportedly also criticized the decision by the administration of President Joko Widodo to allow foreign journalists to enter the restive Papua region.
    “In Tolikara there definitely was foreign [meddling], 1,000 percent,” he said, referring to a recent riot in the Papuan district during which dozens of stalls and a small mosque were burned down and a protester was killed after police opened fire. Eleven others were injured. The incident triggered fears of sectarian violence throughout the country. “Jokowi’s policy to allow foreign media into Papua is wrong, a big mistake,” the professor was quoted as saying by RMOL, a local news portal. “Foreign intelligence agents can enter with press IDs. Seriously, who are his advisers?”



    Papuans behind bars- June update
    According to Papuans behind bars there were at least 45 political prisoners in Papua at the end of June 2015. Information received from defence lawyers in Manokwari reported that three detainees who were arrested last month for their involvement in a peaceful demonstration were severely beaten in detention by police Mobile Brigade (Brigade Mobil, Brimob) officers. At least one of the three, KNPB member Alexander Nekenem, was tortured by Brimob officers who stubbed cigarettes out on him. Under instructions from the Head of the Manokwari Regional Police, AKP Tommy H. Pontororing, lawyers were denied access to their three clients following the escape of Narko Murib, a fourth detainee in the same case. Due to barriers to access, lawyers only found out about the torture and ill-treatment endured by the detainees several days after. A second case involving arbitrary violence perpetrated by Brimob officers was that of the fatal shooting of Yoteni Agapa, a 19-year-old Papuan in Ugapuga village in Dogiyai Regency. Brimob officers shot Agapa when he started arguing with them regarding a confrontation that had occurred earlier in the day. This tendency for Brimob officers to respond in such a trigger-happy manner is not uncommon. Since the start of 2015, at least two people have died and seven have been injured as a result of excessive use of force and misuse of firearms by police in Papua. So far, there have been no independent investigations into these incidents and thus the perpetrators continue to enjoy total impunity. Ongoing investigations by the National Human Rights Commission (Komisi Nasional Hak Asasi Manusia, Komnas HAM) into the ‘Bloody Paniai’ incident of December 2014 seem to have stalled, reportedly due to a lack of funding. Additionally, separate investigations conducted by the Ministry of Politics, Law and Security alongside the Papuan National Police, criticized by human rights observers as lacking credibility, seem to be complicating matters still further. 14 students were arrested in Abepura and Waena for fundraising in support of the Komnas HAM investigations into Bloody Paniai. This case echoes the Yahukimo arrests in March 2015, where more than a hundred people were arrested in relation to a week-long fundraising event for Cyclone Pam victims in Vanuatu. The arrests show that public rallies of any kind in Papua continue to be suppressed, even those for humanitarian purposes. Full update at http://www.papuansbehindbars.org/?p=3540


    Papua’s maternal health  lags behind, says UNFPA Jakarta Post, July 09 2015
    The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) has said that Papua continues to lag behind in maternal health compared to other areas across Indonesia despite significant improvements in the country’s health outcomes over the years. In Papua, 16 percent of women begin childbearing between the ages of 15 – 19, or twice as high as the national figure. “Health providers in Papua are not trained to deal with adolescent reproductive health issues, and hospitals and community health centers are generally unable to provide youth-friendly health services,” says UNFPA Indonesia. On Wednesday, to improve maternal health care delivery, UNFPA launched a pilot initiative entitled Men Care Papua, which aims to engage men and boys in Papua on sexual and reproductive health issues and on the prevention of gender-based violence in Jayapura. UNFPA says family planning is also not common practice in Papua, with low use of any modern methods of contraception among married couples. The contraceptive prevalence rate in Papua is only 24.5 percent, which is quite low compared to the national coverage of 61 percent. The province also suffers from a generalized HIV epidemic, with a prevalence rate of 2.4 percent among 15-49 years old. “This is triggered mainly by unsafe sexual behavior,” says UNFPA. Furthermore, UNFPA says that violence against women and children in Papua is also high. According to the National Socio Economic Survey on Violence against Women and Children in 2006, Papua had the highest prevalence of violence against women and children in Indonesia. “It is statistics like these, indicating pervasive gender inequality, which led to Papua being selected as the pilot location for the new male engagement initiative,” UNFPA Indonesia representative Jose Ferraris said during the launch of the initiative. “A second reason was because the government and civil society organizations in Papua are truly committed to working to address these challenges,” he went on. During the launch, Rutgers World Population Fund (WPF) director Monique Soesman and Men Care Papua program manager Siska Noya shared success stories and progress the program had achieved in East Java, Jakarta, Lampung, and Yogyakarta. (ebf)(+++)




    Jokowi Urged to Rationale Number of Soldier in West Papua 
    Jayapura, Jubi – Indonesian President Joko Widodo was asked to send official letter to Papua Police Chief and Cenderawasih XVII Military Regional Commander to reduce the excessive number of organic and non-organic military troop in Papua. “The excessive military placement is not related with the conditions of people, it have impact towards civilians,” Peneas Lokbere, the Coordinator of United for Truth (BUK) stated in the press conference in commemorating 16th years of Bloody Biak Incident, 6 July 1998 at KontraS Papua Office on Monday (6/7/2015). He cited a number of military posts that spread throughout Meepago region. For example, there is a number of military posts in one regency, such as at Enarotali, the capital of Paniai Regency. “At Enarotali only there are 8 military posts of each unit,” he said without elaborating which unit. The shooting against 4 students in Paniai on 8 December 2014 was occurred due to the excessive number of soldiers who have nothing to overcome their burden and embrace the people so they see people from different view. “There are so many soldiers at the post but have nothing to do so they shot people for killing time. There is a troop with unclear intention. They shot people with the weapons that were bought with people’s money,” Lokbere said. Youth activist Resco Yesnat from Garda Papua said until now the shooting continues to be happened among the Papuan people without resolution. According to him, the unsolved human right violation cases indicate the State’s point of view towards the people of Papua. “The shooting was happened because this country never consider Papuans as part of Indonesia,” he said. (Mawel Benny/rom)


    The Construction of Brimob Headquarters and Military Command is Scenario ‘ to Protect’ Investors 
    Jayapura, Jubi – The plan to build Brigade Mobile (Brimob) headquarters in Wamena, Jayawijaya, and establish the West Papua military command are part of efforts to protect the interests of investors, said chairman of the Papua Legislative Council on human rights, Laurenzus Kadepa. “I suspect it is a scenario that will lead to additional troops, for the benefit of investors in Papua,” Kadepa said. “The latest information I heard, PT. Freeport will the largest under ground open mining and will open up new land in Wabu Blog spreading out in Intan Jaya, Deiyai, Dogiyai and Paniai. It is a cheap scenario that will only Jaya, Deiyai, Dogiyai, and Paniai. It was the only cheap skanario harm people or native Papuans, ” he told Jubi on last week. The plans could lead to human rights violations including the killings of more Papuans, he said. “This is Indonesia way to weaken the strength of indigenous Papuans, until they are helpless. The state only fight for the interests of investors and does not see the indigenous peoples as owners of the land, “he said. State is creating it as if Papua is unsafe. So there will be mining military and military posts for the benefit of investors. “Now native Papuans are increasingly helpless. They are suffering on their own land. State seems no longer consider them, “he said. Therefore, Papua Legislative Council (DPRP) declared its refusal of development plans of Brigade Mobile headquarters in Wamena. Meanwhile, the chairman of DPRP, Yunus Wonda said he is concerned that the existence of command headquarters will add Papuans’ trauma. (Arjuna Pademme/ Tina)


    Depopulation of Papuans Becomes Obvious 
    Jayapura, Jubi – Human right activist Markus Haluk said the threat of Papuan population has became obvious. The population of indigenous Papuan begins to decrease while the number of non-Papua is drastically rising. It predicts the number of Papuan in 2030 would be 15% of total population in Papua comprising of 2,371,800 indigenous and 13,228,800 non-Papuans. Haluk said the change was very visible in Dr. Jim Elmslies’ research of West Papua demographical change. The research indicated the population in Papua in 1971 was 923,000 which comprising 887,000 indigenous and 36,000 non-Papuans. In 1990, it extremely changed. The number of Papuans was 1,215,827 while non-Papuans were 414,210 of total 1,630,107. Fifteen years later, in 2005, said Haluk, the number of Papuans and non-Papuans has become equal. Indigenous Papuans were 1,055,795 and non-Papuans are 1,087,694 of 2,646,489 of total population in Papua. In 2011, it became more surprising. The Papuans have become minorities on their own land. The number of indigenous was 1,700,000 compare with the number of non-Papuans that reached 1,980,000 of 3,680,000 of total population in Papua. This change then predicted that the number of indigenous Papuan would become 1,956,400 while the population of non-Papuan would become 4,743,600 in 2020 of 6,700,000 of total population in Papua. The number would continue to improve in 2030, that is the number of Papuan would turn 2,371,200 and non-Papuan would become 13,228,800 of 15,600,000 of total population in Papua. “The change of population number has extremely occurred though the number of birth was decreased. It was happening because none of leaders paying attention on this issue,” Haluk said in One-Day Seminar held by Foreign Affairs of Papua Central Highland Association of Indonesia (AMPTPI) and Student Executive Body of Jayapura Science and Technology University (BEM-USTJ) on Wednesday (29/7/2015). Meanwhile Yulianus Mabel who participated in the seminar said this change has become obvious. Poor health services towards indigenous Papuans and rapid access of non-Papuans to entry to Papua were highly influenced this change. “I hope the government could pay attention on this changing instead to regard this as regular circumstance. The government is much care about their own business and its counterparts than paying attention to the threat of the existence of indigenous Papuan,” he said. (Mawel Benny/rom)



    A google translate of article in Jubi. Be-aware google translate can b e a bit erratic

    Three People Political prisoners in prisons Wamena Reject Clemency

    Posted by: Islami Adisubrata on July 9, 2015 at 23:58:23 WP [Editor: Angela flassy]

     Meky Elosak, Yusanur Wenda and Wiki Meage when met in prison Class II B Wamena. Jubi / Islami Wamena, Jubi - Three political prisoners who are now in the Penitentiary (Prison) Class II B Wamena states reject granted clemency or exemption from the President of the Republic of Indonesia, Joko Widodo. Yes, in August next president’s plan to re-grant pardons to prisoners of conscience and political prisoners in Papua, after the last few months five former political prisoners and detainees were released by the state. These three political prisoners who reject the clemency granted that Meky Elosak, Wiki Yusanur Meage and Wenda are all alleged to have committed acts of treason, with the decision of the prison are manifold. Meky Elosak together Wiki Meage reject granted clemency because they consider themselves innocent, so why should be granted clemency by the Indonesian government? Both himself accused of acts of treason in 2009 in the District Yalengga, Jayawijaya at which time it was found to be carrying the Morning Star flag. Yet according to Meky Elosak recognition, he and Wiki Meage carry the flag at the time there was grief and do not do the raising and both sentenced to eight years in prison. "I do not feel guilty, why should be granted clemency by the President? So we refused, “said Meky Elosak when met reporters in Wamena prison on Thursday (09/07/2015). As for Yusanur Wenda involved the burning of one of the government buildings in Tolikara in 2004, was sentenced for 17 years and refused clemency because it did not want to part with his friends at the institute. “I refused because there are friends here (in prison, ed)," said Wenda Yusanur. While the third legal counsel, Anum Siregar, SH when contacted JUBI explained, originally at around dated June 25, 2015 he was contacted by the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights Papua province, to inform that the President will again give pardon to political prisoners in Papua. And on June 29, 2015, Anum Siregar to Wamena to submit a plan for the granting of pardon to Meky Elosak and comrades in prison Wamena, but before him, three refused. "This pardon will be given in August, but three refused and we respect their decision. However, they are asked to make a statement that is not willing granted clemency, but was not made, "said Anum Siregar. (Islamic) islami


    PIF urged to discuss rights abuse in West Papua RNZI 28 July 2015
    The Australia West Papua Association is calling on Pacific Islands Forum leaders to address what it describes as a deteriorating human rights situation in Indonesia's Papuan provinces. Its call comes in the lead up to the 46th Pacific Islands Forum Leaders Summit to be held in Papua New Guinea in September. The group says Indonesia's security forces used excessive and often lethal force on peaceful protesters in West Papua on numerous occasions in 2014 resulting in at least four deaths. The association is urging the leaders at the summit to discuss the human rights situation in West Papua and seek Indonesia's approval for a Forum fact finding mission to West Papua. It is also calling for the release of all West Papuan political prisoners and the granting of observer status to genuine representatives of the Melanesian people of West Papua.


    Tahiti Forum bid could trigger domino effect

    RNZI 3 August

    An academic says there could be a domino effect of non-independent territories seeking to join the Pacific Islands Forum if French Polynesia achieves membership. The French territory, which currently has observer status at the Forum, is looking at increasing its involvement in the leading regional body. A Forum mission has recently been in Tahiti to assess its membership bid. The director of Massey University's Pasifika Centre, Malakai Koloamatangi, says while France is reluctant to entertain the idea of its territories becoming independent, it wants to engage more with the region and having Forum membership could help effect this. "If it works out for the French territories, who knows, American territories might follow suit if it's shown that joining the Forum in a more meaningful way might be more beneficial for them."


    Opinion pieces/press releases/letters/etc.


    Photos of Freedom Flotilla at

      


    Contesting Melanesia: The  summit and dialogue



    Diocesan priests voice concern over injustices in Papua



    Sapariah Saturi and Agapitus Batbual 



    The article includes video footage and photos

    Talk About It: Five key things to know about West Papua


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    2) Insight: Papuans must benefit  from resource exploitation - 

    3) Legislator calls to probe Israeli presence in Tolikara
    4) President Jokowi to Build Presidential Palace in Papua
    5) Government Fails to Guarantee Religious Freedom, Rights Group Says
    7) THERE’S A PROBLEM WITH WEST PAPUA
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    http://www.antaranews.com/en/news/99823/10-firearms-investigated-over-tolikara-incident

    1) 10 firearms investigated over Tolikara incident

    Kamis, 6 Agustus 2015 03:44 WIB | 313 Views
    Jayapura, Papua (ANTARA News) - Papua Provincial Police have seized 10 firearms from Police Mobile Brigade (Brimob) personnel questioned in connection with the July 17 attack in the Karubaga region of Tolikara District, Papua Province.  

    The questioning was held at the police forensic laboratory center in Makassar, South Sulawesi province, Chief of the Papua Provincial Police Station Brig. Gen. Paulus Waterpauw said here on Wednesday.

    The firearms were checked according to the mechanism. Some of the Brimob personnel carried firearms at that time, he said. 

    The 10 firearms belong to Brimob personnel assigned in Karubaga, Waterpqau said adding a total of 40 Brimob members have been questioned so far.

    After all, the shooting which left 11 civilians injured with gunshot wounds on their feet and arms followed the standing procedure, he said.

    The gunshot wounds were the result of bullet reflection as they directed their firearms to the ground and not to crowd.

    A group of local Muslims were attacked while performing Eid al-Fitr prayers inside the yard of Karubaga district military precinct on July 17.  

    At least two people have been named suspects in the case. They admitted to have pelted stones at the Muslims.

    The suspects, identified as AK and JW, were arrested on July 24 for their alleged involvement in the attack, spokesman of the Papua provincial police headquarters Senior Commissioner Patrige said.

    Vice President Jusuf Kalla condemned the incident, which had resulted in the death of a local resident and injuries to several others during the local policemens efforts to control the chaotic situation.(*)


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    2) Insight: Papuans must benefit  from resource exploitation - 
    Medelina K. Hendytio, Jakarta | Insight | Wed, August 05 2015, 4:30 PM - See more at: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2015/08/05/insight-papuans-must-benefit-resource-exploitation.html#sthash.ruDyJnW1.dpuf
    Once home to thick tropical forest, many parts of Papua seem to have been turned inside out and filled with holes as a result of overexploitation of natural resources. The rivers have changed color because of the accumulation of waste from mining operations for the last 50 years, including that of PT Freeport Indonesia (FI), which arrived in the mid-1960s. 

    Freeport alone has been held responsible for the damage of 30,000 hectares of rainforest, as well as the Ajkwa and Kopi rivers (Abrash and Kennedy, 2002). Other sources suggest that the mines have already released one billion tons of tailings into the local river system, resulting in copper concentrations in the river water double the tolerable limit (Indonesian Forum for the Environment, 2006) at the expense of indigenous people, primarily the Amungme and Kamoro tribes, who depend on nature for food, water and other basic needs and cultural practices.

    Mining operations are also associated with conflict and violence. Labor and land disputes and human rights violations by companies as well as the military in suppressing labor unrest or protests have brought the state and society into conflict. 

    Mining operations that blatantly disregard the customary rights of the indigenous Papuan community have created structural injustice. Many Papuans feel that their natural riches have been stolen from them, their cultural and customary land rights neglected and their access to jobs denied. 

    This historical record needs to be reopened, especially now that the government is negotiating an extension of Freeport’s contract. The government has hinted its approval of the continuation of Freeport’s operation for the next 20 years, following the willingness of the US-based gold mining company to accelerate the regime change from contract of work (COW) into a special mining license (IUPK) before the contract expires in 2021. 

    However, there are still legal issues hampering this early negotiation process. Article 112B, paragraph (2) of Government Regulation No. 77/2014 states that a request for operation extension can only be submitted to the energy and mineral resources minister at the earliest two years and no later than six months before the expiry date, which in Freeport Indonesia’s case is 2019. This article will prevent the obtainment of an extension approval by Freeport from the government this year. 

    However, it seems that there will be tremendous efforts by Freeport and the government to resolve the issue before 2019. Nonetheless, there is still enough time for the government to formulate the terms and conditions to ensure that Indonesia maintains its sovereignty over the wealth of natural resources in Papua, as well as the freedom and authority to stop Freeport keeping all the wealth for itself. 

    The history of major liquid gas producer PT Arun NGL in Lhokseumawe, Aceh, should serve as a lesson. The company ended 36 years of operation on Oct. 15, 2014. Termination of the company’s operations raised fears of a rise in poverty in the area. Workers who were brought in from other areas to Lhokseumawe went back to their hometowns without transferring their knowledge and skills to the locals. 

    All this indicates that mining or resource-based companies have not made sufficient social and economic investment to ensure the sustainability of public welfare. Corporate social responsibility programs, as well as local governments, have failed to prepare local people to acquire skills and sustain economic activities. 

    PT Arun built good infrastructure and provided assistance to the local government, but without a sufficient maintenance budget, facilities degrade in no time. Lhokseumawe remains financially weak, educationally undeveloped and lacking in jobs. But a company’s exploitation of resources without an appropriate long-term exit strategy cannot improve the public welfare. This truth is borne out in regions across Indonesia.

    If Freeport’s extension is granted, the company will operate until 2041, 26 more years of extracting gold and copper from Papua to send overseas. A huge amount of taxes and royalties will fill the government’s coffers, financial resources will flow to the Amungme and Komoro tribes for community development and education and health care will become available to surrounding communities. But the questions remain: Is the material reward proportional to the amount of natural resources and environmental damage caused? How will tax revenues and royalties, as well as corporate social responsibility, be utilized to develop human resources and sustain Papua’s future?

    Papuans have never really benefited from their homeland’s incredible natural wealth. Discrimination against them in terms of employment remains unabated, as their skills remain poor. Conflicts and social tensions between residents and tribes persist, alongside the political conflicts that enflame longing for independence. 

    Negotiations within the framework of Freeport’s extension of operation have resulted in the agreement of a number of points, prompted both by the central government and partly by local administrations. 

    Of the 11 points raised by the Papua administrations, four especially need to be implemented, as they concern the future of Papua, especially after Freeport leaves. The four points in question concern the management of environmental impacts, the eventual closure of the mine, mining regulations and the role of local human resources. 

    Implementation of these four points will guarantee environmental protection and the dignity of the Papuan people. They need to be elaborated into concrete action plans, with implementation and progress open to public scrutiny or monitored by relevant civil society groups. Above all, Papuans must see improvements in living standards, welfare and dignity if Freeport is allowed to operate for the next 20 years.
    _______________________

    The writer is a senior researcher at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Jakarta. - 


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    3) Legislator calls to probe Israeli presence in Tolikara
    Rabu, 5 Agustus 2015 20:03 WIB | 409 Views
    Jakarta (ANTARA News) - Chairman of the Commission I of the House of Representatives (DPR) Mahfudz Siddiq has called for a probe into the alleged presence of Israelis
     and Zionist symbols in Tolikara, Papua.

    Their motive would not be to spread their religion as Judaism is an exclusive religion, the lawmaker affirmed here on Wednesday.

    "The presence of Israeli citizens in Papua and Israeli symbols in Tolikara as reported on the social media is not by accident," he stated.

    He suspected that the Israelis are being used for a political operation in Papua, in general. Therefore, the security authorities must thoroughly investigate their presence in Papua.

    "It is most likely that a certain party has used those people to conduct a political operation in Papua," he said. 

    Not only in Tolikara, but the government, through the National Police, the National Intelligence Agency (BIN), the Indonesian Defense Forces (TNI), and the foreign ministry, should also investigate 
    the presence of Israeli passport holders, he added. 

    The Tolikara case could not be considered as a serious issue if it is not related to the Papuan separatist movement. 

    However, the case could become a serious issue if it is related to the separatist movement in Papua. 

    "They just need a trigger. We need to remember that maintaining peace in Papua is not only in the interest of Indonesia but also in the interests of several other countries," he added.

    The Tolikara case is a warning for the government to comprehensively solve the Papua problem, he stated. 

    The Tolikara incident occurred on July 17 morning when hundreds of people attacked and pelted stones at the Muslims performing outdoor Eid al-Fitr prayers at the military offices 
    yard in Karubaga sub-district, Tolikara district, forcing the worshippers, who are Muslim minority in the area, to flee to a nearby local military office for protection.

    The mob set fires that burnt down more than 50 kiosks and houses, as well as the Baitul Mutaqqin mosque.

    The attack prompted security officers to open fire at them. Some 11 perpetrators, who are members of the Evangelical Church in Indonesia (GIDI), were injured, while one was killed in the shooting.

    The Tolikara GIDI had earlier issued a circular banning Muslims from performing Eid al-Fitr prayers in the district, as it had coincided with an international Evangelical Churches meeting on July 13-19, which was attended by 2.5 thousand participants, including representatives from the Netherlands, the United States, Papua New Guinea, Palau, and Israel.(*)

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    WEDNESDAY, 05 AUGUST, 2015 | 16:08 WIB
    4) President Jokowi to Build Presidential Palace in Papua
    TEMPO.COKembu - President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo plans to build a presidential palace in Papua, according to Presidential Chief of Staff Luhut Binsar Panjaitan during his visit to a school in Kembu, Tolikara, Papua, on Tuesday, August 4, 2015.
    "This year, the president will build a presidential palace in Jayapura," said Luhut as quoted by Derwes Jigwa, spokesman for the Tolikara regional government on Wednesday, August 5, 2015.
    According to Derwes, Luhut was observing the development in Kembu district together with Tolikara Regent Usman G. Wanimbo, several Tolikara officials and presidential staffs. Derwes said that Luhut did not provide details on the location of the presidential palace.
    Luhut said that Tolikara must take full responsibility of the development of education in the region and urged everyone to prevent future conflicts similar to the incident that occurred on July 17, 2015.
    Luhut added that President Jokowi has promised to improve fundamental development in all sectors in Papua. Luhut underlined that there are three important sectors that will be prioritized, namely education infrastructure, and corruption eradication.
    MARIA RITA

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    5) Government Fails to Guarantee Religious Freedom, Rights Group Says

    Yogyakarta, Jubi – The Commission for the Disappeared and Victims of Violence (KontraS) deplored the incident in which a mosque was burned in Tolikara, Papua.
    The incident on July 17 was allegedly triggered by the shooting of civilians, triggering panic among local people.  After the incident, some religious leaders and public officials have fueled the tensions by giving provocative comments in media.
    KontraS said following Tolikara incident, at least there are three incidents of vandalism and burning over the house of worship in Palu (Sulawesi Tengah), Purworejo (Jawa Tengah) and Bantul (DI Yogyakarta).
    “We assumed those incidents were a vengeance related to the last incident at Tolikara that triggered by provocative comments,” KontraS stated in Press Conference published in KontraS official website on last month.
    For not being anticipated and letting the provocative sentiments related to race and religious issue that raised in some Indonesian’s regions indicated that the State is frequently absence in every efforts to guarantee a protection towards it citizens in freedom of faith, especially the right to do a worship.
    Instead of provide a protection to its citizens; it has an impression that the State did a negligence and discrimination. Though the freedom of worship is guaranteed in the Constitution 1945, namely Article 28 E paragraph 1 and 2 and Article 29 paragraph 2 which says ‘Each person is free to have a religion and do a worship according to their belief. Law No. 39/1999 about Human Rights said,” Each person has a right to have a belief, states their thought and act according to their compassion; State guarantee the freedom of its citizens to have their belief and do worship according to their religion and belief”.
    The Law No 12 2005 about International Covenant Endorsement about Civil and Politic Rights Article 18 said “everyone has a right of freedom of thought, faith and religion as well as the protection of those rights, and Article 27 said  “and the act to protect the ethnic group, religion and minority language might be a responsible of State,”.
    Referring to several laws and Tolikara incident, KontraS considered the State has failed in providing a guarantee to protect the freedom of belief. The State has conducted a humanity crime due to its negligence when it acted permissively over many violation incidents on religious base.
    Therefore, KontraS condemned all forms of violence in the name of religious and destruction of house of worship both in Tolikara or any regions in Indonesia. In addition, KontraS urged the government to conduct an evaluation on regional regulation related to religion, which actually create a discrimination against minority religious community. We shall remind that Indonesia is not the State of Religion; therefore it is not justified to make Religious Law into State Law.
    KontraS also urged the Indonesian Police taking action against perpetrators of violence and vandalism over the house of worship both in Tolikara or other regions, including those who spread the provocative messages or calls. “We also remind and believe that all religions/beliefs are created to eliminate any type of violence and avoid the hatred or prejudice,” stated KontraS. (Arnold Belau/rom)
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    6) AMPTPI Urges Police to Question Shooters of Tolikara Incident
    Jayapura, Jubi – The Students Association of Central Mountains urged Papua Police to stop summoning GIDI leaders and the two people detained by Papua regional police related to Tolikara case on July 17.
    “Police should end the examination of the TRC committee and GIDI board because both parties have agreed to peace,” the chairman of Executive Board of Eastern Indonesia, AMPTI said in Waena,Jayapura, on last week.
    Andy then urged police to examine police officers and members of security who did the shooting that killed one person and injured 10 young men that led to the burning of kiosks owned by residents.
    “If police keep forcing, people will get angry. AMPTPI will do mobilization. Police must focus on the shooting case instead “said Gobay.
    Previously, Ustad Ali Mukhtar who represents Muslims in Karubaga, Tolikara requested that the legal proceedings ongoing as a result of the incident in Karubaga was stopped.
    “We agree that the prisoners to be immediately released so that this problem is not prolonged. We apologize if we’ve done mistakes, “said Ustad Ali.
    While President GIDI, Rev. Dorman Wandikbo hoped that all GIDI church throughout Indonesia to be freed worship. As according to him, there are several churches of GIDI in some areas Indonesia are closed due to Tolikara incident.
    “Some GIDI churches are closed. GIDI congregation also experience intimidation and violence. Therefore we want to solve the problem peacefully for now and forever. We want resolve our problem today, so that our people can worship as usual,” Rev. Dorman said (Mawel Benny/Tina)


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    Surfing Life (blog)
    7) THERE’S A PROBLEM WITH WEST PAPUA
    5 August
    Words Wade Davis
    An excerpt from our current special edition, Aftermath. See what else is inside over here, otherwise, just look out for the Mick and Julian cuddle on the cover.

    With waves like this, Indonesia's northern coasts should definitely be on our minds. But let's not forget about the locals' plight when we're daydreaming about drainers. Photo: Stu Gibson 
    During the course of your internets you may have stumbled across social media posts supporting the Free West Papua movement. West Papua is the Indonesian half of Papua New Guinea. It is the Indonesian half of Papua New Guinea and not the western half of Papua New Guinea because West Papua was colonially Dutch while PNG was German. When the Dutch were forced out of the region, the west half went to the newly formed nation of Indonesia, or something like that.
    Or something kinda not really like that at all. After World War II, when the Dutch left the rest of Indonesia, they stayed in West Papua. The newly formed Indonesia was going, Oy, give us West Papua like you gave us everything else, and the Dutch were like, Nahhh, we want to stay here, or at least we’ll give West Papua to the Papuans.

    The colour of this water isn't deceiving. It actually looks like this. Photo: Brad Masters
    But the Indonesians weren’t having it, and they insisted that the Dutch hand over the territory. After a while the Americans and the United Nations were like, Maybe you should let the Papuans decide, and so in 1969 Indonesia organised a vote, called The Act of Free Choice, and invited 1000 handpicked Papuans and forced them to vote in favour of becoming a part of Indonesia. How do we know this? Because the United Nations watched it all happen.
    Since then the Indonesians haven’t been very nice to the Papuans, with over 500,000 being killed by Indonesian security forces, with many more raped, tortured or imprisoned. They’ve been denied access to even the most basic human rights and have had any opposition to Indonesian control of their land violently quashed. The Indonesians have showed that they are adamant that West Papua is a part of Indonesia.

    Photo: Stu Gibson
    This is because West Papua is a very resource-rich region and it spins a lot of money for the Indonesian government. There are vast swathes of rainforest being cut down by the military, and the world’s biggest goldmine is in West Papua – the American owned Freeport mine in Grasberg. The rights to this mine were drawn up between Indonesia and the Americans in 1965 – four years before West Papua even became Indonesian. There’s a very feasible theory that it was this mine that greatly influenced America into supporting Indonesian control over West Papua.
    As for the Indonesians, well they honestly see West Papua as being a part of their country, and they have international law to back them up. They view Papuan claims of separatism as undermining their sovereignty and use what they see as appropriate force to protect what is theirs. They will not give us West Papua – they’d be crazy to – but there is hope that they can make moves to grant the Papuan people greater autonomy.

    The bird of paradise comes from around here. So does the beachie of paradise, aka this place. Cooper Chapman getting his slice. Photo: Brad Masters
    As surfers we’ve been exploring West Papua for a while now: its northern coasts are exposed to northern hemisphere winter swells (Hawaii season). The people of West Papua are lovely and generous; their land is some of the most breathtaking in the world. We recommend that you do some of your own research on West Papua and the Free West Papua movement, as there are some pretty full-on things happening not only in a surf zone, but a surf zone that is just north of Australia.
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    2) 1965 Massacre Seminar Cancelled After Intimidation
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    http://m.thejakartapost.com/news/2015/08/06/army-chopper-shot-papua.html
    1) Army chopper shot at in Papua
    thejakartapost.com | August 06 2015 | 8:06 PM An Indonesian Army helicopter was allegedly shot at by an unidentified person in Papua on Thursday.

    Army spokesman Brig. Gen. Wuryanto said that one bullet-sized hole was found in the body of the helicopter. No casualties were reported.
    However, the bullet itself has not been found.

    Wuryanto said the helicopter was delivering goods to Army officers in Jila district, Mimika, Papua.

    “At 7.55 a.m., the helicopter was approaching to land, but because of bad weather, it did not land,” Wuryanto said.

    When the helicopter decided to return to its post in Timika, the pilot felt that something hit the left side helicopter.

    Upon inspection, an officer found one hole, which was similar to what would be left by a bullet, near the fuel shell.

    Wuryanto said his team was still investigating the incident. (ika)(++++)

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    http://en.tempo.co/read/news/2015/08/06/055689790/1965-Massacre-Seminar-Cancelled-After-Intimidation




    THURSDAY, 06 AUGUST, 2015 | 21:50 WIB
    2) 1965 Massacre Seminar Cancelled After Intimidation
    TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - A seminar on 1965 massacre in Salatiga, Central Java, was cancelled following an act of intimidation and terror. "The event will be postponed until undetermined time," said the Head of 1965 Massacre Victims Research Institute (YPKP 65), Bedjo Untung, on Thursday August 6.

    “Some local organizations called for the locals to wage jihad and attack the seminar,” said Bedjo. He added that prior to the seminar, social media was filled with hatred messages, showing communist flag near the seminar site.

    “I have confirmed with the committee and such news was nowhere near true. It was a mere manipulation and provocation,” he said. "We are fighting for the rights of the victims of massacre, asking the state to reinstate their rights."

    The incident is the second thing to happen to YPKP 65 in the past six months. Previously, YPKP 65 meeting in Bukittinggi, West Sumatra, shared the same fate as the locals forced it to end.

    RADITYA PRADIPTA


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    2) Marie Leadbeater: Defence ties with Indonesia valued over Timor Leste justice

    3) Insight: Determine gold  output ahead of Freeport  deal -
    4) National scene: Lawmaker  alleges Jewish conspiracy  in Papua 
    5) Tolikara Incident Reveals Indonesian Law’s Anomaly
    6) Jayapura City Government Launches School Feeding Program Based Local Food
    7) Schools in PNG to Teach Indonesian
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    http://www.solomonstarnews.com/news/regional/7793-forum-leaders-to-talk-west-papua

    1) Forum leaders to talk West Papua

    PACNEWS - INCREASED regional awareness of alleged violence and human rights violations in West Papua has convinced the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat’s Specialist Sub-Committee on Regionalism (SSCR) to recommend that it becomes one of the five priority issues to be the agenda of the Pacific Forum Leaders when they meet in Papua New Guinea next month.
    The recommendation will go before the Forum Officials Committee (FOC) for a final endorsement, when it meets in Suva next week. 

    SSCR documents obtained by PACNEWS reveal the Sub-Committee decided to act after an ‘increasing groundswell of support in the region for the people of West Papua, reflected in part by the media, particularly social media.’ 

    In addition, the Sub-Committee received three strong submissions from various interest groups around the region advocating the peaceful resolution of the struggles of the people of West Papua. 

    In recommending the Sub-Committee’s suggestion for the agenda issues, Forum Secretary General, Dame Meg Taylor said since the Leader’s statement in 2006, ‘proponents suggest that the human rights situation has deteriorated.’ 

    “The Sub-Committee acknowledged the Forum’s history and regional role in assisting territories achieve self-determination, said Dame Meg. 

    The 2006 Forum Leaders expressed concerns about reports of violence in Papua and urged Indonesian authorities to bring to justice the perpetrators of serious crimes in the Province of Papua. 

    Pacific Forum Leaders will be asked to consider the situation in West Papua and publicly express their concerns over human rights and to resolve difference between all parties by peaceful means. 

    In June this year, the Melanesian Spearhead Group admitted the United Liberation Movement for West Papua as an observer member while Indonesia was granted associate membership. 

    From submissions made to the Specialist Sub-Committee on Regionalism, three possible actions were recommended.

    These include a fact finding ministerial group from the Pacific Islands Forum to West Papua, include West Papua on the UN Decolonisation List and impose sanctions against Indonesian companies and government enterprises found to be committing human rights abuses. 

    However, the Sub Committee recommends that Leaders consider additional alternative options – ‘to seek political dialogue with Indonesia, through the Post Forum Dialogue process to discuss human rights situation in West Papua, seek to engage at the ministerial level through the Forum Foreign Ministers and direct the Forum Secretariat to maintain a watching brief and submit a report to the next Leaders meeting.’ 

    “Addressing the issue of West Papua issue has the potential to create tension amongst Forum members and with Indonesia given the bilateral relations members have with Indonesia and its status as a Post Forum Dialogue Partner, acknowledges the SSCR report. 

    The decision on whether the issue will be taken up to the Leaders in Port Moresby next month will be determined by the Forum Officials Committee. 

    Source – PACNEWS
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    2) Marie Leadbeater: Defence ties with Indonesia valued over Timor Leste justice
    5 comments

    I have just visited Timor Leste, 16 years after my last visit.
    It was a study in contrasts.
    I went to contribute to a conference at the National University of Timor-Lorosa'e, where one theme was the role of Western nations during the 1975 Indonesian invasion and 24 years of occupation.
    In April 1999, the Indonesian military was still in control and, unbeknown to me, about to unleash a wave of unspeakable violence against the population. Three months earlier, Indonesian President Habibie had proclaimed that the Timorese people could choose whether or not to remain with Indonesia. Portugal and Indonesia were finalising terms and the National Council of Timorese Resistance (CNRT) was preparing to campaign.
    The Liquica massacre took place two days after my arrival. Some 60 civilians who had taken shelter in the Catholic church were killed by the ferocious "Red and White" militia. Instead of relaxed meetings with community figures, I found myself visiting severely wounded victims in the Motael Clinic in Dili.

    I came home to campaign against the crazy notion that the Indonesian security forces could be trusted to ensure the security of the referendum process. Sadly, the Government believed the violence was caused by "competing factions" and only changed tack when the country was in flames following the cataclysmic post-referendum violence of September 1999.
    On my return visit, I strolled along the beautiful Dili beachfront and saw not soldiers but courting couples, hawkers offering sweet oranges and women performing traditional dances. Timor Leste's distinctive red, yellow and black flag, which once adorned New Zealand campaign badges, was everywhere.
    This image of serenity is not the whole story: the country was forced to rebuild after the departing Indonesian military ravaged the country and forcibly displaced much of its population. The container ship anchored offshore came in loaded with cheap imported goods, but many bemoaned the lack of export production, beyond crafts and coffee growing. Oil boosts the Government's coffers, but Australia refuses to negotiate a fair maritime boundary while continuing to exploit oil fields that ought to belong to Timor.
    In Liquica, 26km from Dili, a memorial garden honours the heroes of the independence struggle. Further on, 'Balibo Five' graffiti is daubed on the road embankments. Five western journalists, including New Zealander Gary Cunningham, were killed in October 1975 as they tried to tell the world about Indonesia's covert incursions into then Portuguese territory. Two important buildings have been restored to commemorate the events and the journalists. The Balibo Flag House and Community Learning Centre is funded by an Australian trust. Behind protective glass it still bears the Australian flag one of the journalists etched on its wall in a futile effort at self-preservation.
    It is ironic that the Balibo Five are honoured here, while in their homelands governments do little, notwithstanding a 2007 Sydney inquest which determined they were killed in cold blood by Indonesian Special Forces. Successive New Zealand governments have opted to leave the initiative up to Australia.
    Statues and gardens commemorate resistance heroes in Dili. There is a well-appointed Resistance Archive and Museum, and a Xanana Gusmao reading room. The Chega exhibition occupies several rooms and cells in the old prison at Balide. Graffiti from former inmates has been preserved while multimedia displays summarise the story told in the five-volume report of Timor's impressive Commission for Reception, Truth and Reconciliation. CAVR's careful forensic assessment concludes that there were up to 183,000 conflict-related deaths
    Unfortunately, only minor players have faced sanctions while Indonesian officers charged before the UN backed tribunal a decade ago have gone on to new terror fields in West Papua, continue to travel the world freely and even stand for the highest political office.
    In 2002, then Foreign Minister Phil Goff said New Zealand should share some responsibility for its failure to condemn the 1975 invasion and the subsequent suffering of the Timorese people. At present, however, it seems defence ties and a good relationship with Indonesia come ahead of historic justice.
    • Maire Leadbeater is the former spokesperson for the Auckland East Timor Independence Committee and author of Negligent Neighbour; New Zealand's complicity in the invasion and occupation of Timor-Leste, Craig Potton, 2006.
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    3) Insight: Determine gold  output ahead of Freeport  deal -
    Greg Poulgrain, Brisbane, Australia | Headlines | Mon, July 27 2015, 4:58 PM - 

    One main issue is still to be resolved in the hard bargaining by Freeport Indonesia regarding its contract of work. Agreements have already been reached to enhance share divestment, increase the royalties and build a new smelter, despite the temporary delay over the location. A deadline is approaching and anxious hands on both sides of the table are keen to conclude a deal. 

    Freeport wants a new contract of work now, rather than in 2019 when it was due to be negotiated. Investment security for an expansion of mining operations is given as the reason. The deal will cover mining operations up to 2055. Although described as a “victory for Indonesia”, the main issue is still absent from discussion so there is an urgent need to review what Freeport is actually doing. 

    PT Freeport has said it plans to spend about US$17 billion expanding underground mining at Grasberg in the province of Papua before 2021. Annual turnover is now calculated in tens of billions of dollars, and Freeport’s contribution for tax revenue for the government of Indonesia is regarded as massive and most welcome. 

    Already Grasberg is a vast underground mining complex spreading in different directions. At least two of these huge underground operations are devoted entirely to gold mining. Expanding these and starting others is the main aim of the proposed development. Copper is not the main goal yet many descriptions of the Freeport mine still state it is “a copper mine with some gold”. 

    The Grasberg is unprecedented — the world’s largest primary deposit of gold. It is so large that Freeport have relinquished other sites in Papua where there were other significant gold deposits. A few years after the Grasberg came into production in 1989, one Freeport vice president told me its potential looked so large it could involve 200 years of mining. 

    The Grasberg was first discovered in 1936 by the Dutch geologist, Jean Jacques Dozy. He was the person who gave it the name, Grasberg, at the same time as he named the Ertsberg. They were two kilometers apart, at either end of a once-peaceful meadow just below the snow and glaciers in the Papuan highlands. After Freeport used helicopters to test-drill both sites in the early 1960s, Grasberg lay waiting to be mined. A mountainous outcrop of copper and gold before mining began in 1972, the Ertsberg was transformed into a gigantic hole in the ground. By 1987, when Freeport was ready to start mining the Grasberg, its potential was “discovered” and mining began two years later. The deal which Freeport concluded at that time did not benefit Indonesia as it should have. 

    The main issue is gold. This vast primary deposit was never mentioned in the 1960s during the anti colonial campaign to reclaim Netherlands New Guinea as part of Indonesia. Neither then president Sukarno nor Kennedy was aware of the gold deposit in the territory or how it was influencing political decisions behind the scenes. However, former Dutch foreign minister, Joseph Luns, whom I interviewed July 15 on 1982, when he was NATO secretary-general, was well aware of the gold in New Guinea. He stated that he had proposed a joint-operation with the Americans (in those days, the Rockefeller company was known as Freeport Sulphur) but the answer was negative. 

    American determination to claim sole access to the gold took effect when Soeharto came to power. In the same way that I gained a better understanding by speaking with Jean Jacques Dozy (in his home in the Netherlands) I would suggest that Indonesian government officials involved in current negotiations ask Freeport to clarify certain points. 

    For example, during 15 years of mining, the Ertsberg gold concentration was stated to be around 2 grams/ton yet the concentration in official Dutch reports and confirmed during the interview with Dozy was 15 grams/ton. This discrepancy needs to be included in current negotiations between Freeport and the Indonesian government. The Ertsberg and the Grasberg, it should be stated, have geologically developed from the same subterranean source. 

    An article in Indonesian media last week suggested the construction of a local smelter was one way to detect the difference between official and unofficial Freeport gold production. Those involved in negotiating on behalf of the Indonesian government should ascertain actual current gold output from the Grasberg. The gold concentration included in the copper-slurry, which is then refined in a smelter (in Indonesia or overseas), will show approximately the same level that has been stated year after year. This is because gold is removed before the slurry is pumped down the pipeline to the coast for export.

    The gold that is extracted is then converted into small ingots. A Timika-based Freeport security official told me that the gold, in this form, is transported by vehicle to the Timika airport where it is loaded into a private plane then flown overseas. This occurred during the lifetime of the Ertsberg mine and has continued with the Grasberg. Government requirements for a smelter will bring some financial benefit, of course, but not address the main issue, so the hard bargaining remains to be done. 
    ___
    The writer teaches Indonesian history at the University of the Sunshine Coast, Brisbane. He wrote The Incubus of Intervention: Conflicting Indonesia Strategies of John F. Kennedy and Allen Dulles.
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    4) National scene: Lawmaker  alleges Jewish conspiracy  in Papua 
    The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | National | Thu, August 06 2015, 2:31 PM - 

    Chairman of House of Representatives Commission I overseeing foreign affairs and defense Mahfudz Siddiq has called for a probe on the alleged presence of Israeli nationals and Jewish religious insignia on houses in Tolikara, Papua.

    Mahfudz said that although it was impossible that Israeli nationals had been conducting proselytizing projects in the area, the authority needed to conduct a probe soon.

    “Evidence about the presence of Israeli nationals in Papua, as well as photo’s of Jewish insignia on houses in the area have been circulating on social media and this is no coincidence,” said Mahfudz, a lawmaker from the religious Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) as quoted by tribunnews.com.

    Mahfudz claimed that since Judaism was an exclusive faith that does not allow conversion into it by non-Jewish people, he suspected that some of the Israeli nationals were running a political operation in the area.

    “It is likely that they are conducting an operation over the whole of Papua and not just Tolikara. The National Police, the National Intelligence Agency [BIN], the Indonesian Military and the Foreign Ministry need to conduct a probe on people with Israeli passports,” he said.

    Earlier last month, a fatal clash between Christian and Muslim groups in Tolikara led to police shooting guns, the death of one teenager, the torching of a mosque and the destruction of a number of kiosks. 

    The authorities said that tensions were triggered by a letter from the Tolikara chapter of the Evangelical Church of Indonesia (GIDI), demanding that local Muslims not carry out loud outdoor Idul Fitri prayers on July 17. - 
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    5) Tolikara Incident Reveals Indonesian Law’s Anomaly
    Yogyakarta, Jubi –  “Strange but true. The odd phenomenon of law enforcement is truly happened in the Republic of Indonesia. Gradually but sure the opinion twisted by national media about the arrest of community members accused as the actors behind Tolikara incident is likely revealing the untruth of law enforcement agents that during the time doing discrimination against the dark-skinned and curly-haired people in the land of Papua,” Wilem Wandik, the Indonesian Councilor from Papua as cited from his official website on Tuesday (4/8/2015).
    We definitely could digest such issue very well using the logic and common sense to analyze a trigger leading to the incident occurred on 17 July 2015.
    According to Wandik, the chronology of incident is following: (1) Distribution of Circular – (2) Police keep allow Muslim community to do prayer outside and guarantee their protection by holding long guns – (3) people come to the venue of Muslim’s activity – (4) the Police shot the civilians – (5) dozens of civilians were injured and 1 killed – (6) people did anarchy in responding the burtal shooting – (7) several stalls and a small mosque were burned.
    “The anger would not be triggered if the security forces didn’t open fire brutally as if the curly-haired and dark-skinned people are not human beings who have the right to live,” he said.
    “To the owners of national media, those who lead the public opinion and published unbalance reportage, could you say a name of Muslim community who killed in Tolikara incident? What are their names? Where are they coming from? It seems to emphasize the sectarian problems based on religious issue; you (national media) forget the fact that the incident was a provocation of security forces by neglecting any social symptoms that actually could be prevented and it aggravated with the brutal act of shooting against civilians that killed a civilian,” he wrote.
    He further wrote the journalists thoroughly highlighted the civilians who’ve been accused as provocateurs of the incident. Such drama is really disgusted. On the other hand, people who have been the shooting victims had balance coverage by national media.
    “That’s a perfect story of law enforcement in Papua, which is the real criminals could have a peaceful life and not touched by Law,” he said.
    Jubi earlier reported that GIDI and Muslim communities in Tolikara have agreed to resolve their dispute. Both sides also agreed to solve their problem alone without any intervention from the parties outside of Papua. Facilitated by Interreligious Harmony Forum (FKUB) on Wednesday (29/7/2015), both sides have agreed on seven points as references of conflict resolution. The sign of agreement was held in FKUB Office and witnessed by the Regional Board of Nahdatul Ulama Province Papua, Kingmi Church Synod and Papua Civil Society. (Arnold Belau/rom)

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    6) Jayapura City Government Launches School Feeding Program Based Local Food

    Jayapura, Jubi – The mayor of Jayapura on Tuesday launched a school feeding program based on local food in collaboration with the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP).
    The head of the Education Department of Jayapura, I Wayan Mudiyasa, said the local government was committed to implementing the program for 12 schools in Muara Tami and Abepura district which runs from August to December 2015.
    “This program is adjusted to the national guidelines ,” Mudiyasa said during the launch at the Elementary School, SD Inpres 2 West Koya on tuesday (4/8/2015).
    “Do not provide a complete food such as rice and side dishes. But in the form of appropriate snacks that meet safety standards and good quality, made from local agricultural produce, food contains 300 calories and 5 grams of protein and provided three times a week,” he said.
    e continued, the purpose of the implementation of PMT Program is to make the city of Jayapura as a pilot area PMT national program and supports an increase in the level of presence of children in the class, students’ concentration, students’ nutrition and an increase of the income of local farmers to supply raw materials to school.
    In the same place, Benhur Tommy Mano, Mayor of Jayapura asserted, in order to support the activities of PMT-US, each school must have a school garden.
    “I urge all principals who are here are required to have a school land, so that the food we manage are from their own agricultural products,” he said.
    “Later, I’ll come and check in every school, whether there is agricultural land or not,” he continued. For mothers – women who cook food for children will earn additional incentives,” he said. (Munir/ Tina)

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    7) Schools in PNG to Teach Indonesian
    Kuala Lumpur, Jubi – The Indonesian government and Papua New Guinea (PNG) agreed to increase the number of cooperation projects such as in the education and economy sectors in the future.
    “We will explore some pilot projects with PNG in order to strengthen relations between the two neighboring countries,” said Minister of Foreign Affairs, Retno Marsudi, after a bilateral meeting with the Foreign Minister of PNG, on the sidelines of the ASEAN Ministerial Meeting (AMM) 48th in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday (4/8/2015).
    She explained that the pilot projects in the education sector include providing Indonesian language teaching in schools at both Secondary School and High School.
    “Maybe we start from two or three schools first and PNG may choose either at the middle school or high school,” he said.
    Principally, PNG agreed to explore the possibility of Indonesian language teaching in their schools, she added.
    Furthermore, cooperation in the economic field must also be improved in the interest and mutual benefit between the two neighbors, including in the context of Melanesia.
    “Besides PNG, we are also increasing collaboration in the context of Melanesia by performing a number of arts and cultural activities,” she said. (*)
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  • 08/08/15--14:41: 1) West Papua at PIF meet



  • 2) In Papua, Indonesia, a Visit to the Welcoming Dani People

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    WP Action Auckland letter in Solomon Star

    1) West Papua at PIF meet











    DEAR Pacific Island Forum leaders,

      We are writing to you at a critical juncture for the people of West Papua and           regional recognition of their struggle to end human rights violations in their land. 
      We call on you to extend your support by prioritising the human rights issues in    West Papua at the 46th Pacific Island Forum (PIF) meeting to be held in  September 2015 in Papua New Guinea.






    We urge you to advance the gains made at the recent Melanesian Spearhead  Group (MSG) Leaders Summit in Honiara, July 2015, where the historic decision was made to grant the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) Observer status in the MSG.

    Ongoing Human Rights Violations 

    International and Indonesian human rights groups have regularly documented violence in West Papua, including the extensive use of intimidation, torture, sexual violence, beatings and killings by the security forces.

    The United States State Department 2014 Human Rights report on Indonesia exposes and condemns gross and persistent human rights violations by the Indonesian authorities in West Papua.

    Throughout last year, there were harsh crackdowns on numerous peaceful rallies.

    All sectors of society in West Papua including lawyers, human rights defenders, activists, clergy and journalists faced regular intimidation or the threat of arrest.

    The year ended with a shocking massacre of four school boys when on 8 December 2014 security forces fired into a crowd of approximately 800 peaceful demonstrators (including women and children) in Enarotali in the Panai regency.

    Despite international media coverage the perpetrators have not been brought to justice.

    This reality is all the more grim when one considers the fact that violent crimes committed by police and security forces are rarely punished.

    Indonesia is failing to address serious concerns regarding impunity for security forces.

    Amnesty International states: “Impunity for human rights violations is commonplace. Accountability mechanisms to deal with police abuse remain weak, and reports of torture by members of the security forces often go unchecked and unpunished.”

    Political prisoners languish in jail in West Papua for nothing more than raising the Papuan Morning Star flag or taking part in peaceful events.

    In August 2013, four leaders were arrested at a solidarity event in West Papua that included a prayer meeting and the display of the Morning Star, Aboriginal, and Torres Straits flags inside a church.

    On 1 May 2015 over 260 West Papuans were arrested by security forces for simply taking part in peaceful rallies in contravention of their right to freedom of expression and assembly.

    They were commemorating the 52nd anniversary of the administrative transfer of West Papua to Indonesia.

    West Papua is currently off limits to international journalists.

    Foreign journalists trying to report on West Papua have been arrested, deported and even imprisoned.

    While Indonesia's president Joko Widodo announced the end of the decades-long restriction on foreign journalists reporting on West Papua during a visit in May 2015, the President’s assurance has already been cast into doubt by contradictory statements made by members of his administration stating that foreign journalists would still have to apply for permits and would be subjected to screening.

    During the same visit to West Papua Indonesian President Joko Widodo announced the release of five political prisoners, under ‘clemency provisions’ which require them to admit guilt for their past actions.

    If the release of the five prisoners is to be seen as genuine progress, it must be followed by an increase in the rights and democratic freedoms of the Papuan people.

    Unfortunately there are signs that the opposite is happening.



    Indonesia’s Development Policy

    Indigenous West Papuans are now a minority in their land.

    From a large majority (96.09%) of the population in 1971, projected population figures for 2020 place West Papuans at 28.99% of the population, highlighting a rapidly changing demographic.

    The Indonesian government’s policy to accelerate development in West Papua policy is unlikely to bring peace or development.

    It is, in fact, likely worsening the human rights situation in West Papua and further marginalising West Papuan people economically, socially, politically and culturally.

    West Papuans must contend with the exploitation of their rich timber and mineral resources for which they receive little benefit.

    Large-scale mining and deforestation are causing massive social dislocation, devastation of rainforests and pollution of streams and rivers which people depend on to survive.

    The United National Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has written to the Indonesian government to express concern about the impacts of the planned large-scale Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate (MIFEE) project, which involves the conversion of a vast area of land, including forests, into plantations growing food, energy and other crops, on the indigenous peoples affected by this agro-industrial mega-project.



    Role of the Pacific Island Forum

    West Papua has always been considered part of the Pacific Community. Netherlands New Guinea, as West Papua used to be known, was a member of the South Pacific Commission (SPC), a forerunner of the PIF.

    West Papuans attended the SPC meetings until the Netherlands ceded its authority to the United Nations Temporary Executive Authority in 1962.

    From the time Indonesia took control of the territory in 1963, West Papua has been excluded from regional meetings.

    West Papuan leaders are turned down when they ask for observer status, but Indonesia is accepted as a ‘dialogue partner’

    However, some of the most significant efforts to inspire action to end human rights violations in West Papua have come from countries in the South Pacific region.

    Leaders of Nauru and Vanuatu spoke in support of self-determination for West Papua at the UN Millennium Summit in New York.

    Nauru also invited West Papuan representatives to be part of the official Nauru delegation at the 2000 PIF summit in Kiribati.

    Then president of Nauru, Mr Bernard Dowiyogo, declared, “[I]f the Forum is to continue to be relevant then it must confront such issues which are important to the lives and democratic rights of the people of our region.”

    Subsequent PIF meetings have included expressions of concern about the human rights situation in West Papua.

    However, in recent years the PIF has dropped the human rights situation in West Papua from its agenda and West Papua has not been mentioned in the official PIF Communiqué.

    Now, after over 53 years of political struggle for the right to self-determination, the ULMWP—the unified and recognised coordinating body representing West Papua with support throughout Tanah Papua—was granted Observer status by the 20th MSG Leaders summit in Honiara.

    It is noted that the Solomon Islands Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare, as chair of the Summit, played a significant role in ensuring this historic decision was made.

    This political recognition provides opportunity for West Papua to participate in regional dialogue with Indonesia for the first time in history.

    It is clear that this step was achieved through the increasing support from the people of the Melanesian countries, as well as those in the wider Pacific region and beyond.

    Currently, West Papuan leaders are committed to non-violent means to achieve their aspirations and to resolve problems and grievances.

    The PIF has proven itself to be an effective regional advocate. The forum—whose mandate is to promote regional stability—has a responsibility to help resolve this longstanding Pacific conflict.

    It is incumbent on the PIF to take substantive action. Specifically, we urge the leaders of the 46th PIF summit to:
    • Devote serious attention to West Papua’s deteriorating human rights situation and make reference to the on-going human rights abuses in West Papua in their annual communiqué.
    • Establish a regional Fact Finding Team to conduct a Human Rights Assessment in West Papua.
    • Support the call made by the former Prime Minister of Vanuatu, Moana Kalosil Carcasses at the 25th Session of the UN Human Rights Council in March 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland, for the UN to appoint a special representative to investigate alleged human rights abuses in West Papua.
    • Grant observer status to genuine representatives of the Melanesian people of West Papua, those who are struggling for their right to self-determination.
    We thank you in advance for acknowledging the rights and aspirations of the people of West Papua as a priority issue.
    _____________________
    travel NY Times

    2) In Papua, Indonesia, a Visit to the Welcoming Dani People

    AUG. 6, 2015

     The thatched-roof homes of Wesagalep lay at cloud level, high above the Baliem Valley in Papua, the Indonesian side of the island of New Guinea. They are built on about six terraced levels of the mountain, with startling views of the valley and down to the rushing river below……………………….

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    2) Linus Hiluka: Ex-Political Prisoners Have Not Received Release Letter

    3) Government Urged Tackle Tolikara Incident Wisely, Church Leader Says

    4) Presidential Chief Advisor Meets Leaders of Church in Papua

    5) Papua Province Makes Progress on Forest Rehabilitation

    6) More than 114.201 Tourists Visited Papua
    7) Papua is Held Hostage by Global Capitalists

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    1) Three Wamena Political Prisoners Accuse Lenis Kogoya of Lying to Public

      
    tabloidjubi.com | West Papua DailyThree political prisoners in Wamena : Melki Elosak, Wiki Meage and Yotano Wenda – Jubi

    Wamena, Jubi – Three political prisoners in Wamena – Melki Elosak, Wiki Meage and Yotano Wenda – accused the president’s special staffer Lenis Kogoya of lying to the public when said that they did not reject an offer for pardons or release by the president.
    “In the meeting with him, we never said we’re accepted the president’s pardon. We rejected it. Lenis Kogoya should not exploit Papuans for their own benefit,” Elosak firmly said on Thursday (6/8/2015).
    Besides refusing a pardon, the three political prisoners who’ve been jailed for treason case also rejected any term of assistance offered by State. “Stop exploiting our names by saying we accepted the offer of pardon, although there would be some gifts for us, such as car, house and money. We don’t need all of it, because we’ve been arrested and jailed because of the unjustice,” Elosak said.
    He also confirmed that he and his two fellows got a visit from the president’s staff for several times, and the last visit is when Lenis Kogoya came offering a pardon and planning to give them cars, houses and money but they’re simply refuse it.
    “If they want to release us, why is it just now? Because we will be free about a year, so what a pardon is for? Besides, we are not guilty,” said Elosak.
    Earlier, the president’s special staff, Lenis Kogoya told reporters when doing a visit to Wamena on Tuesday (28/7/2015) that he met with the political prisoners Melky Elosak, Yusanur Wenda and Wiki Meage to discuss about their release. Although some media reported that the three political prisoners who currently jailed at Wamena Prison rejected the pardon, but Kogoya admitted they never said refuse. “I have met three political prisoners at Wamena Prison. They should be release. From the meeting, they didn’t say a rejection,” said Lenis Kogoya. (Islami/rom)
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    2) Linus Hiluka: Ex-Political Prisoners Have Not Received Release Letter
    Wamena, Jubi – Five ex-political prisoners who were granted pardon by President Joko Widodo on 9 May are now questioning the existence of a presidential decree on their release.
    “Up to now we have not received the original letter of president’s decree on the release of five of us, which has been handed to an appointed person but until now the letter has not been delivered,” one of the former prisoners, Linus Hiluka, told reporters in Wamena on Wednesday (5/8/2015).
    In addition, after being released for about two months, he said he and his fellow ex-convicts have not seen the president’s promises during their release materialized, including more openness in Papua and access to foreign journalists as well as the guarantee for the security of five ex-political prisoners and Papuans.
    He also affirmed that along with the release of political prisoners, there are persons who take advantage of them, act on behalf of them asking for goods or money that they never ask for to the government. “I have seen on media about fund disbursement, and I will reiterate that referring to our initial agreement, we refused all kind of government’s offers because we are already free to live among family and community and able to make a living on our own and people,” he said.
    He also hoped his two fellows who are taped in a TV station in Jakarta could give respect to their decision and return to their family and community without intervention of any parties.
    He further asked to a person who brought his two fellows to Jakarta and other culprits to stop offering or submitting proposal on behalf of five ex-political prisoners to the government because they initially had agreement to refuse the government’s aid in any terms.
    Related to grant amounted Rp 2.6 billion provided by the Central Government to ex-political prisoners, Linus Hiluka said he and fellows Numbungga Telenggen and Kimanus Wenda would never accept any assistance.
    “I’ve heard about it from media, the government prepared some cash for ex-political prisoners, but I confirm never receive it and will refuse it,” he said.
    Meanwhile, religious leader and human right activist in the Papua Central Higland, Pastor Jhon Djonga expected well communication was built between the ex-political prisoners, especially to those who were taken to Jakarta. “I hope the five ex-political prisoners have good communication among them to avoid misperception about their initial agreement. About the president’s original letter, I hope certain people not to take benefit of it,” said Pastor Djonga. (Islami/rom)

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    Jayapura, Jubi – The chairman of Central Papua Baptist Church Fellowship Services Agency, Socratez Sofian Yoman, urged the government to handle the aftermath of the Tolikara incident wisely.
    He said the incident has drawn attention from the central government, including the president, the military and police chiefs as well as the general.
    “I see this as a distraction of issues. One important issue is the murder case of security forces against civilians in Paniai on 8 December 2014. There are also other cases such as Yahukimo case, and so on. This is an attempt by the state to divert attention from those issues,” Yoman told reporters at GKI Papua Synod Office, Argapura, Jayapura City on Wednesday (5/8/2015).
    He further questioned the State’s attention when numbers of house of worship in several areas closed by certain parties. He took the ban of GKI Yasmin Church in Bogor by local mayor as an example.
    “Where is the State? Where is the justice, the Constitution, Pancasila (State Philosophy) and Bhineka Tunggal Ika (slogan: Unity in Diversity)? Is it only written in the book? Where is it when Syiah and Ahmadiyah were being hunted?” he said.
    He said the problem of Papua is not a minor issue; it’s not a matter of full stomach or economy, but it’s a matter of identity, dignity, the future and political status that being questioned by the people of Papua. Therefore, it needs a broader dialogue for resolution.
    Meanwhile the Chairman of GKI Church Synod in Papua, Albert Yoku said Tolikara incident was an explosion of the puzzles of cases occurred in Papua, such as Paniai case, Yahukimo case and another important cases that not getting serious attention from the Government as it did in Tolikara incident.
    “I hope the same spirit could be used to settle those cases. Do not only focus in Tolikara incident that make it likely a huge issue, but it’s only a small case in reality. Tolikara incident is a crash over civilization and to open our eyes about the fact that minority groups in Indonesia must get a justice,” said Yoku. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)
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    4) Presidential Chief Advisor Meets Leaders of Church in Papua
    Jayapura, Jubi – The head of Presidential Affairs Staff, Luhut Panjaitan, met four leaders of the church synod in Argapura, Papua on Wednesday (5/08/2015) to discuss the incident of Tolikara that occurred on July 17.

    “The civilization of Papuans in spiritual building, education, health, economy and infrastructure was actually established by missionary that ultimately gives the growth in human resources for the Papuan people for years,” Albert Yoku said after the meeting.
    However, when government took over the region that has been built by missionary, it implemented its own policy and it is contrary to what is already there.
    “The government brought its own culture, religion, and its own interests and do not collaborate with local religious leaders. Government also does not support all activities such as social, economic, health and church activities that have been done in Papua including Tolikara,” he added.
    Especially for Tolikara incident, GIDI and NU FKUB agreed to not carry this case through the legal process, according to him.
    “We conveyed to the presidential staff that all legal proceedings against the four leaders of GIDI must be in accordance to an agreement on July 29. We’ve written a letter to the Police for investigation and requested suspension of two people in custody, of church leaders of GIDI. We hope the government will give space to those who have agreed to sit down to talk, “he added.
    Meanwhile President of GIDI, Dorman Wandikbo said, the chronology of Tolikara incident has been made. It was signed, and handed over to President Jokowi through Luhut Panjaitan
    The church leaders are Albert Yoku (head of GKI Synod in Papua), Benny Giay ( head of Kingmi Synod), Socratez Sofian Yoman ( head of Baptist Synod) and Dorman Wandikbo (President of GIDI). (Arjuna Pademme)
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    5) Papua Province Makes Progress on Forest Rehabilitation



    Jayapura, Jubi – Provincial Government of Papua has rehabilitated forest areas covering 14,525 hectares during between 2010 and 2014, planted as many as 6.2 million stems.
    Assistant Secretary of Public Affairs of Papua Province Rosina Upessy, in Jayapura, on Wednesday (5/08/2015), said one of the principal efforts in watershed management (DAS) is a form of regulation of land use and forest rehabilitation efforts as well as soil conservation.
    “I remind the working commette of the Forest and Land Rehabilitation (RHL) that rehabilitate degraded land is not just planting trees alone but it should be an ongoing effort to restore the carrying capacity of the watershed,” he said.
    It is necessary to realize the functions of forests and land in order to decrease erosion, sedimentation, runoff, improve water balance and enhance the socio-economic benefits, she said.
    “The culture of the community as well as the climatic conditions which have their own characteristics also become non-technical barriers in the field. Thus, the involvement of the parties is very important to facilitate the implementation of RHL in the field,” she added.
    She explained the damage of watershed in the upstream, midstream and downstream is increasing due to an increase in the utilization of natural resources for human needs.
    “It happened since the utilization of natural resources has not been fully pay attention to the stability and sustainability of the carrying capacity of the environment,” she said again.
    Therefore natural resource management with watershed management unit should be implemented wisely in order to support the improvement of people’s welfare.
    “To maintain the continuity of the basic functions of forests and forest conditions, it is necessary to implement forest rehabilitation,” she said. (*)

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    6) More than 114.201 Tourists Visited Papua
    Jayapura, Jubi – Indonesia’s Tourism Ministry on Wednesday (5/8/2015) announced eight million foreign tourists visited Indonesia in 2014.
    The numbers of tourists who visited Papua Province from 2006 – 2012 reached 114,201, including 15,711 foreigners.
    Further, the minister said the Festival of Humbold Bay is not only for introducing the culture in Humbold Bay but also becoming a place to learn of many visitors, as well as connecting the creative industry makers, community base tourism actors from all over Indonesia, including local small entrepreneurs of coastal area who also participated in the festival.
    Humbold Bay Festival attended by the Papua Provincial Government representing the Central Government, Jayapura Municipal Government, traditional leaders from 12 villages, religious leaders, local community and entrepreneurs was very lively and colored by a number of Port Numbay native dance of 12 villages.
    “The Tourism Ministry would continue to support the promotion of Humbold Bay Festival that took place at Hamadi Beach, Jayapura to be a target of domestic and international tourism in the next following years,” said the minister.
    At the same place, Jayapura Mayor Benhur Tommy Mano in his speech said we should be grateful for the diversity given by God to our country that attract many domestic and international tourists to keep visiting Papua.
    Tourism development is also becoming a concern of Jayapura Municipal Government. Currently, Jayapura Municipal Government is improving to grow the tourism sectors. For example, the occupancy rate of hotels in Jayapura is getting better; traveling tours are now still in needs including the growing of culinary business.
    “The government will continue to prepare public facilities to support the development of tourism sector, including work together with the Police and Military to create a secure atmosphere for the systems of tourism and environment in Jayapura Municipality through providing a security guarantee for both domestic and international tourists,” said the mayor. (Munir/rom)
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    7) Papua is Held Hostage by Global Capitalists

  • By   Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat Media Wahyudi Askar and Shu-Wen Chye
  • •   August 8, 2015

  • The case of Freeport is a clear illustration of Papua and the Indonesian government being held hostage by global capitalists. 
    Papua, formerly known as Dutch New Guinea, is the western half of New Guinea, an island in the Pacific. For decades, Papua has been a region associated with conflict and has rarely received international press coverage. There have been many civilian casualties resulting from violence between Indonesian security forces and the local community. To this day, there are no visible signs that the conflict will end anytime soon.
    As is widely known, Papua has one of the largest gold mines in the world. Forbes Wilson, the director of Freeport—one of the world’s largest producers of copper and gold—discovered Papua’s natural resource potential after conducting surveys on Mount Ersberg in 1959. Freeport’s desire to exploit Papua’s gold mines at that time was hindered by a change in political constellations in the 1960s. The government under then-Indonesian President Sukarno took over Papua from the Dutch in 1961, after which Freeport was prevented from setting up operations because of Sukarno’s opposition toward foreign enterprises.
    However, after Suharto ousted Sukarno in a 1965 coup, the former decided to issue a law that authorized and encouraged foreign investment. Freeport became the first foreign enterprise to operate in Indonesia and secured long-term contracts with the Suharto regime.
    Since then, Freeport’s approach toward Papua’s resources has been aggressive and almost militarist in nature, which has caused deep-running tensions between Freeport, the Indonesian military and the local Papuan community.
    Freeport’s assertion of its presence in Papua continues to be strong in the 21st century. Indonesian Corruption Watch (ICW), a Jakarta-based nongovernmental organization, has reported that security fund payments have been made by Freeport to Indonesian security forces. According to ICW’s data, which is sourced from financial statements of Freeport, the company issued a fund worth $79.1 million from 2001 to 2010. This funding is believed to have affected the neutrality of the armed forces and fueled tensions between them and local residents, due to the widespread belief that only the military has reaped the benefits of revenue generated by Papua’s natural resources.
    The severity of the conflict increased soon after the assassination of Leo Yogi, the commander of the Free Papua Movement for Paniai region, in May 2015. Even though the situation has improved slightly following Indonesian President Jokowi’s decision to grant clemency to five Papuan political prisoners and offer access to journalists to enter Papua, Freeport’s decision to build a copper smelter not in Papua, but in Gresikan island in the region of Java that is of great distance from Papuahas increased tensions again between Papuans, Freeport and the Indonesian government.
    The decision has received much criticism from Papuans, with the governor of Papua, Luke Enembe, threatening to expel Freeport if the smelter is not developed in his vicinity. The construction of smelter located locally in Papua would be beneficial, because such a project would help the local economy by attracting up to 30 billion rupiah in investment and creating up to 10,000 jobs. These resources are desperately needed in Papua, given the high levels of unemployment and poverty.
    Throughout this time, Freeport has revealed that the main reason behind its decision was the limited availability of water and electricity in Papua. In reality, there are two other reasons why Freeport has been persistent with its plan to construct smelter in Gresik.
    First, the history of tension and increasing instability in Papua has created an environment of fear that could potentially disrupt the company’s operations, thereby requiring Freeport to spend a substantial amount of money to enhance security for its operations.
    Second, concerns over the availability of labor are key. It is widely known—based on data provided by the Human Development Index (HDI)—that HDI ratings in Papua are one of the lowest in the region. Local labor in Papua is considered operationally unprofitable and unable to meet the needs of the processing plant in the short-term. Alternatively, Freeport could employ labor from outside Papua, which would then require higher salaries to be paid.

    Enter Uncle Sam

    Freeport has always claimed that it has fulfilled its obligation to distribute profits to the Indonesian government, which only holds 9.3% of shares. Nevertheless, the company has never issued any net profit reports publicly for 48 years, since its establishment in 1967. Its success in lobbying the Indonesian government has not been without help from the United States. US Ambassador to Indonesia Robert Blake reportedly held talks with a number of top Indonesian officials concerning Freeport to smoothen the process of extending the existing contract between Freeport and Indonesia, which ends in 2021.
    While Jokowi’s government has made attempts to not be swept by the tide of global capitalism by introducing a mineral ore export ban and tax increases on metal concentrate shipments in January, it has been influenced by plans to invite top US energy companies “to gather opinions regarding the current energy situation in Indonesia.” This is most likely an attempt to ensure continued investments in the energy sector.
    The case of Freeport is a clear illustration of Papua and the Indonesian government being held hostage by global capitalists and local politics. One year into his presidency, it remains to be seen how committed and successful Jokowi’s administration will be in lifting the stigma behind Papua and improving economic inequalities and human rights in the territory in the years to come.
    The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Fair Observer’s editorial policy.
    Photo Credit: US Pacific CommandFlickr

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    Photos from the 

    ‘International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples’ 

     Sydney, on Sunday 9 August 2015, 

    Thanks to all at the Gure Txoko Basque Club for hosting the event










    And on Free West Papua Campaign Australia Facebook page
    https://www.facebook.com/FreeWestPapuaCampaignAustralia
    A very Big Thank you to The Basque Club Sydney for hosting the Free West Papua Campaign Sydney and the Australia West Papua Association today at The
    United Nations International Day of the World's Indigenous peoples 2015.
    Wa wa wa











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    2) Banks Must Stand for Papuans
    3) Human Rights violations in Papua to be discussed by the Pacific Islands Forum

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    1) 7,000 Students to Receive School Aid

    Jayapura, Jubi – About 7,000 Papuan students will receive cash aid of Rp 1 million a year from the Papua government through the department of Social Services and Housing.
    “This aid aims to support Papuan students’ education, ” head of Social Service and Housing of Papua Province Rebekah Haluk said in Jayapura on Thursday (6/08/2015).
    He explained that 4,000 of them are in Jayapura city and its surroundings. While the 3,000 others are scattered in the whole territory of Papua.
    “We categorize children who are neglected by their parents as street children,” she said.
    She added children are the future assets and investments, so their growth should get our attention.
    “We hope they can use the money for their education,” he said.
    Previously, as a form of concern for street children, chairman deputy of Papua Legislative Council, Yanni made a visit to shelter house at Jalan Pasir Sentani, Jayapura district on Saturday (07/03/2015).
    She said as many as 30 children are accommodated in foster house and taken care under Institutions Women Service Center in Papua (LP4I). (Alexander Loen/Tina)
    —————————————————————————-

    2) Banks Must Stand for Papuans


    Jayapura, Jubi – Hironimus Hilapok said the development of small and medium business enterprise managed by indigenous Papuans has been stagnant, while those belonging to non-Papuan entrepreneurs are growing.
    According to Hilapok who’s the General Trustee of PT. Adi Karya Tbk, this current situation was applied because of non-Papuan entrepreneurs –Chinese, Javanese and Makassar descendants—have recognize the trading system since Dutch colonialism for three hundred years ago.
    Meanwhile, Papuans were not familiar with modern business in their national system. Trading is new for them. Papuans were introduced with trading systems at the early of 1970es, and it is getting better in the early of millennium era.
    Hilapok said this condition was very influenced to native entrepreneurs but it’s not a problem. This problem could be solved if both local and central governments and banks reform the capital provision system. The government and banks should provide a greater support to Papuans.
    “Banks couldn’t provide the investment for Papuans along with non-Papuans. For those who are used to in business, having the additional capital made them grow faster, while those who are not familiar in business are not able to grow,” he said on Thursday (6/8/2015).
    He further said this problem has been occurred for a long time but never been a solution. Any relevant studies to improve the trading system among Papuan entrepreneurs have never been conducted; or if the study was existed, the government never used it to develop the economic of indigenous Papuans.
    The government and banks should not sustain this system. The alterations must be done for Papuans could become a master on their land through economic sustainability. Both government and banking should give more supports to indigenous Papuans.
    “The government or banking shouldn’t be still. They must push Papuans to have courage. The encourage towards the weak could put them up to equal position,” he said.
    Meanwhile, the Student Forum Coordinator of Papua and West Papua Development Care, Demas Wandik said Papuans could be success but there’s impression that Jakata do not give supports. Jakarta always restricts Papuans to become great entrepreneurs. “We can see there is no huge project gave to Papua entrepreneur. Papuans do not have an opportunity due to a stigma about their capability,” he said. (Mawel Benny/rom)

    ————————————————————————————————————-
    3) Human Rights violations in Papua to be discussed by the Pacific Islands Forum
    Statement by the LP3BH-Manokwari  (Institute of Research, Analyzing
    and Development of Legal Aid)

       The LP3BH is delighted to know that the question of human rights violations in the Land of Papua perpetrated by the Indonesian security
    forces (TNI/Police) is to discussed at the forthcoming meeting of the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) to be held in Port Moresby in September,
    2015. As many people know, these violations have been going on for the past fifty years.  As we commemorate the Human Rights Month in the Land 
    of Papua which began on 14 July, the LP3BH as a Non-Governmental Organisation
    that focuses on legal rights and the protection of human rights, intends express its support by submitting a number of reports to the
    Secretariat of the PIF about the situation in the Land of Papua. it also intends to submit a number of recommendations suggesting the best
    way to resolve the serious human rights that have been occurring in
    the Land of Papua.

       These human rights violations have been going on for the past fifty years, that is to to say since 1963, reached the highest point  in
    1969 when the so-called Act of Free Choice took place, when the territory of West Papua under the administration of the Indonesian
    security forces.    The LP3BH-Manokwari  has been working for many years in
    collaboration with several international human rights NGOs such as TAPOL in London and several organisations in Australia.

       With regard to the issue of decolonisation for the Land of Papua which will be the most important issue to be raised at that Pacific
    Islands Forum, I herewith state as the Executive Director of the LP3BH that this an a crucially important issue, bearing in mind the
    universal principles of democracy and human rights.

        These human rights violations which have been going for the past fifty years have been perpetrated by members of Indonesian Army and
    Police Force as well as by those who have come to the territory as investors in forestry and mining and have violated the rights of the
    civilian population in the Land of Papua.

       This is a global issue which desperately needs concrete and positive action by the nations that are represented in the PIF as well
    as the friendly states which are members of the Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG).

       President Joko Widodo who is the head of state of Indonesia should respond by acknowledging  the aspirations of the indigenous Papuan
    people to hold a dialogue between Papua and Indonesia to discuss the social and political conflicts in the Land of Papua as the best way to
    restore peace which is what the people of these nations so deeply want.

       The most significant violations that should be considered are: the Bloody Biak Incident  on 6th July 1998, the Manokwari Bloody Incident
    in September 1998, Wasior in June 2001, Wamena, Enarotali-Paniai  in December 2014. and Yahukimo, Wamena as well as the Tolikara Incident
    that occurred on 17th July this year. There were also a number of incidents that occurred in July and August 1969 and throughout 1977
    and 1978 in the Central Highlands. The Government of Indonesia has shown that it has no intention of dealing with any of these violations 
    for which the Republic of Indonesia.should be held responsible.This means that while the perpetrators enjoy impunity the victims sufferings are ignored.
    This also means that all the interest which has been shown by the member-states of the Pif and the MSG is more than ever necessary
    today.

        This also means that the resolution of all the violations that have been mentioned above should be handled by the Governor of Papua
    and the Governor of West Papua, both of whom have now been acknowledged as Associate Members of the PIF and the MSG, along with
    the United Liberation Movement of West Papua which has now been granted the status of Observer Members

    -------
    Yan Christian Warinussy, Executive Director of the LP3BH.

    Translated by Carmel Budiardjo, Recipient  of the Right Livelihood Award, 1995

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    2) Papua invites Papua New Guinea to celebrate Indonesian Independence Day

    3) Australia needs to figure  out its own place in Asia - 
    4) People Complaint Puskesmas Sentani Has No Toilet

    5) Moratorium Impacts Local Fish Supplies in Mimika

    6) The Statement by the Police Force in West Papua does not comply with the law

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    1) KNPB Support Three Issues of PIF Secretariat

    He said of the three issues driven, KNPB is more concerned with the issue of decolonialization. Papua’s status of observer obtained in MSG Summit in Honiara last month has proved Papua as a nation, which should prepare itself to become an independent nation.
    He further said KNPB earlier also stated its rejection against some national and international companies in Papua since those companies have triggered a number of human right violations in Papua. “It’s time to fight the American and Indonesian capitalism in Papua,” he said.
    Meanwhile, Secretary General of the Pacific Islands Forum, Dame Meg Taylor on phone conversation to Jubi on Saturday (8/8/2015) said the PIF Secretariat had three recommendations submitted by several civil society coalitions at Pacific Region. The recommendation would be discussed on next week in the Committee Forum held at Suva, Fiji.
    She told the Pacific leaders would be asked to consider the situation in West Papua and openly to express their concern on human right violations as well as to enforce the settlement of differences between the parties in peace.
    “Three agendas that possibly would be recommended are including the fact-finding mission to West Papua consist of the ministers of Pacific countries, encouraging West Papua to get into the list of decolonization and providing a sanction to the Indonesian private and State companies that are proven doing the human right violations,” Dame Taylor said. (Mawel Benny/rom)


    ———————————————

    http://www.antaranews.com/en/news/99903/papua-invites-papua-new-guinea-to-celebrate-indonesian-independence-day

    2) Papua invites Papua New Guinea to celebrate Indonesian Independence Day

    Senin, 10 Agustus 2015 18:13 WIB | 708 Views
    Jayapura (ANTARA News) - The Papua provincial government will invite representatives from Papua New Guinea to attend Indonesias 70th Independence Day celebrations.

    "The presence of foreign countries will be confirmed on August 15-16," Papuas assistant for Economic Affairs and Social Welfare, Elia Loupatty, stated here on Monday.

    "We hope that foreign countries, especially those close to Indonesia, can attend the celebrations. Their presence will be confirmed next week," she noted.

    According to Loupatty, a simple ceremony will be organized to celebrate the 70th Independence Day of Indonesia.

    "Panjat pinang (greasy-pole climbing), marathon race, and art and cultural competitions will be held to commemorate the event," she pointed out.

    Loupatty stated that the local administration will hold competitions of traditional sports, including a decorative boat event.

    "However, the local government is also concerned about the traffic arising due to the crowds congregating for sacred contemplation at the Trikora Heroes Cemetery and for the commemoration ceremony for Indonesias proclamation of independence at the Mandala Stadium, Jayapura," she remarked.

    She noted that military, police, and community groups will attend the commemoration ceremony.
    (Uu.A063/INE/KR-BSR/O001)
    ————————————————————————————————-
    3) Australia needs to figure  out its own place in Asia - 
    Endy Bayuni and Sabam Siagian, Jakarta | Opinion | Mon, August 10 2015, 6:23 AM - 
    Relations with Indonesia have once again drawn the attention of the foreign policy community in Australia, this time it is not prompted by what Prime Minister Tony Abbott does or says, but rather by a new book that calls for a change in the way the country deals with its giant northern neighbor.

    Ken Ward, a retired Foreign Service officer, in his book Condemned to Crisis (Lowy Institute Paper) calls on Australia to discard the long-held foreign policy mantra that “Indonesia is its most important relationship” and that Canberra should be more realistic in its expectations of Indonesia since relations are always prone to crisis. Ward also suggests that Australian politicians be more circumspect in what they say in public to prevent differences from escalating into crises.

    We fully agree with his bold recommendation to stop making Indonesia Australia’s most important relationship because not only does it make no different to Indonesia, but it also makes us uncomfortable, since we can never reciprocate the feeling. Australia is barely in the top five of Indonesia’s most important relationships; some may even say that it would be lucky to be in the top 10.

    The mantra has been repeated by every single prime minister since Paul Keating outlined it in a luncheon speech in Sydney in 1994 in the presence of then Indonesian ambassador Sabam Siagian. 

    It was really addressed to the Australian public rather than to Indonesia. There are strategic reasons for making the Australian embassy in Jakarta the largest in the world, and for every newly elected Australian prime minister to make Indonesia the destination of his or her first overseas visit. But to call Indonesia its most important relationship smacks of hypocrisy when Australia bypasses Indonesia in economic ties and when Canberra continues to regard Indonesia more as a potential threat than a friend, evidenced by the 2013 revelation of a massive Australian eavesdropping operation on Indonesian leaders.

    This is not to say that Australia is unimportant to Indonesia. 

    Today, the two countries have intensive relationships in all sectors, as two large neighbors should. And there is ample room for improvement, most notably in our economic ties. 

    We should not be under any illusion that relations will always be smooth. There will be differences, and some of these will lead to tensions and turn into diplomatic rows. But then Indonesia also constantly fights with some of its other neighbors like Singapore and Malaysia. 

    If anything, these tensions and rows are indications of the intensity of our relationship. To suggest that the relationship is condemned to crisis, or prone to crisis, is not only stretching it a little but it could lead to wrong conclusions and policy prescriptions.

    Indonesia and Australia are condemned to be neighbors by geographical dictates. But why be so negative about it? Why can’t we say that we are blessed to be neighbors, as we are?

    No two close neighbors can be so unlike as Indonesia and Australia are, but differences in cultures, historical experiences and levels of economic development necessarily make it challenging for the two countries to forge their rich relationship. Sure, both countries have recalled their ambassadors in recent years, but that too is normal in such an intensive relationship. It only becomes a crisis when the two countries sever their relationship or go into a war, which has never happened. 

    Where Ward gets it wrong is in his recommendation that Australians adopt a more temperate language in dealing with Indonesia. Fault their large embassy in Jakarta for failing to inform them that Indonesia today is a vibrant democracy, with free speech that matches any other free society around the world.

    Indonesians can take all the insults Australians throw. Yes, some will be offended, but whatever Australian politicians, media columnists and talk-back radio hosts say about Indonesia, we have heard it worse from our own people talking about our president, government and politicians, corruption, terrorism, human rights violations, Papua and the executions of drug traffickers.

    By being direct, frank and honest, you will get much further in building the trust that is essential in any relationship. You cannot restore trust, which thanks to Abbott is currently in huge deficit, by holding yourself back.

    While we are in the business of being open, here is our frank assessment of Australia. Rather than trying to figure out where Indonesia is heading with all the changes that are taking place in this century, Australia would be better trying to figure out its own place and future in the emerging Asia.

    This is a topic outside Ward’s book, but it is an important question that Australia must answer to be able to craft a more effective foreign policy in building relations with Indonesia and the rest of Asia.

    Australia is struggling with existential uncertainty. Is it part of Asia? Does it want to become part of Asia?

    Its economic future and hence prosperity, is increasingly tied to Asia. China is by far its largest trading partner and Australia is also trading more and more with its Asian neighbors. But that is probably as “Asian” as Australia gets; that, and in addition to its geographic location and the rising Asian mix in its population.

    Politically, Australia is still stuck in 20th century mode. It is a monarchy with a head of state in London, and all its security arrangements are Cold War relics, whereby they take orders from Washington. 

    Australia is out of sync with the emerging geopolitical environment of Asia today. Until Australia fixes this anomaly and moves into the 21st century, it is hard for Indonesia and the rest of Asia to take Australia more seriously.
    __

    The writers are senior editors of The Jakarta Post and former editors-in-chief of the newspaper. They are Class 1979 and Class 2004 of the Nieman Fellowship program for journalists at Harvard University. Siagian was formerly Indonesia’s ambassador to Australia. -
    ——————————————————————-
    4) People Complaint Puskesmas Sentani Has No Toilet
    Sentani, Jubi – Despite its status as a Community Health Center with the best service given by Jayapura Regional Health Office, local residents are still complaining of the services provided by the Sentani Community Health Center (Puskesmas).
    “We are often unable to get a queuing card although we came early. How can it happen when it’s still in the morning? In addition, the service hours seems to be restricted, the staffs are already gone on the lunch time,” Dunlop Hawai resident Dortea Krebru told Jubi in Sentani on last week.
    At the same place, Dorlince Wenda who lives in Camat Lama Sentani said this Puskesmas that actually provided services for decades still do not have a toilet.
    “If the patients from distant want to use the toilet, where to go? Fortunately, the local residents are nicely offering their toilet,” she said.
    Meanwhile, the Head of Puskesmas Sentani Dian Gritnowati when confirmed about the public complaint declined that Puskesmas only provides service until lunchtime. “Currently Puskesmas Sentani provides services for public until afternoon. The staffs are used to go home at four in the afternoon. The patients are used to decrease during the day, but our staffs are still ready to stay in Puskesmas,” she said.
    About queuing card, she admitted it’s intentionally limited, but people still could get services if running out of the card. “But it’s not applied for dental polyclinic where people are rarely to be queued because we only have one staff there,” she explained.
    However, she confirmed about the toilet. She admitted that she proposed it once to relevant office but has no response until now. “Regarding this current situation around the Puskesmas, the environment is not too feasible to build a toilet here,” she said. (Engel Wally/rom)
    ——————————————————-

    5) Moratorium Impacts Local Fish Supplies in Mimika


    Timika, Jubi – Twelve foreign-flag ships are still harboring at Mimika waters to wait for a decision whether to resume operations or to be deported to their home countries after the moratorium.
    “So, we are waiting for the regulation or instruction from the Central Government when those ships could resume their operations or be deported,” the Head of Mimika Marine and Fisheries Office, Ir. Ignatius Eddy Santoso, M.Si said in Timika on last week.
    This is a consequence of regulation issued by the Minister of Marine and Fisheries to extend the moratorium of permit of former foreign-flag ship for six months after the issuance of moratorium until next October. “Since the twelve foreign ships have no activities, the ship crews have been sent home while waiting for regulation from the central,” he said.
    He further declared the operation permit for foreign-flag ship in Mimika region was issued by the Provincial Government instead of Regional Government. “The Regional Government is not authorized to issue permit for those ships. They have a permit from the Provincial Government,” he said.
    According to him, the minister’s policy on moratorium of foreign-flag ship and transshipment applied since October 2014 is regarded a positive influence on Indonesian fisheries sector, especially in Mimika.
    However, in the term of supply, fish supplies for local market are decreasing due to the lack of the ships. Therefore, the local marine and fisheries office made arrangement with distributor to bring the fishes from outside of Mimika region, such as Kamimana and Tual. “Moratorium has impact to the community, that it helps the local community. But it also caused the lack of fish supplies in Timika,” he explained.
    Meanwhile, the extension of ship moratorium is restricted in the Regulation of the Minister of Marine and Fisheries No.10/PERMEN-KP/2015 on the Amendment of the Regulation of the Minister of Marine and Fisheries No. 56/PERMEN-KP/2014 about the Moratorium of Commercial Fisheries Permit in Marine Management Area of the Republic of Indonesia.
    The only change of the regulation is mentioned in the Article 3 in which regulates the validity period of the previous moratorium that only valid until 30 April 2015. While the new regulation signed by the Minister of Marine and Fisheries Susi Pudjiastuti on 23 April 2015 said the moratorium would extend until October 2015 due to extra time needed for verification towards the former foreign-flag ships. (Eveerth/rom)
    ————————————————————
    6) The Statement by the Police Force in West Papua does not comply with the law
      The statement made by J.H. Sitorus, head of public relations of the West Papua Police, as reported in the media in response to the
    aspirations of the Papuan people is very narrow-minded and is not in accordance with the law.

       I say this because the statement is very sceptical and narrow-minded in its failure to  understand the true significance of
    Law 21/2001 on Special Autonomy for the Province of Papua, as amended in Law 35/2008 which makes that same stipulation applicable also to
    the Province of West Papua.

       I should like to point out that Article 48 of Law 21/2001 clearly states that the replacement and appointment of  the Chief of Police in
    Papua and also in West Papua is the responsibility of the governors of the two provinces above-mentioned (see article 48, para 5).

       This is because in the implementation of their respective duties the afore-mentioned officials are accountable to the two governors in
    the Land of Papua. This is because matters of security should always be answerable  to those who are responsible for these matters while
    there should always be co-ordination  between the two chiefs of police.

        As for the aspirations of the Papuan people as expressed through their organisations and their leaders with regard to everything
    regarding the indigenous Papuan people, this should be in accordance with the provisions of these laws on autonomy, with which officials
    like the aforesaid Sitorus who is not an indigenous Papuan should comply.

      The opportunity for an indigenous Papuan to occupy a leading position in the police force has now been granted to Brigadier-General
    Drs Paulus Waterpauw, the Chief of Police of Papua and now also of West Papua.

       Certainly the indigenous Papua people note that besides Waterpauw, there are also several middle-ranking police officers who are likely
    to get the opportunity to occupy these positions when they become vacant.  These officials should make known their views in the print
    and electronic media in Manokwari and West Papua which should be acknowledged and respected by all police officers, including Mr
    Sitorus.

      The fact is that the chief of police in West Papua, Brigadier General Royke Lumowa, has no understanding whatsoever of the
    aspirations of the Papuan people; according to information we have received, the aforementioned officer has been conveying his views to
    several leaders of the community in Manokwari.   In my opinion, the provisions of the police force  in the Land of
    Papua  following the enactment of the Autonomy Law in 2001, it should now be properly implemented, not only by stakeholders such as the
    governors and the members of the legislative assemblies in Papua and West Papua. This means that there should immediately be the proper
    implementation of article 48, para (3) according to which regional provinces should issue regulations regarding the duties of the police
    force in the Land of Papua, with regard to public order and security and their financing, in order to end the anxieties being felt by the
    Papuan people.

      This is a matter of great importance which appears not to have been understood by officers who are now  working in the Land of Papua,
    including Mr Sitorus. The result is that they frequently say things without having any basis in the law, in recognition of the fact that
    the provinces of Papua and West Papua are special regions, as recognised in accordance with the Constitution of Indonesia.

    --------

    Statement by Yan Christian Warinussy, Executive Director of the LP3BH
    - The Institution of Research, Anayzing and Development for Legal Aid.
    8th August, 2015

    Translated by Carmel Budiardjo, recipient of Right Livelihood Award 1995.
    ——————————————————-

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    3)  Human rights in Indonesia onjust before the 70th anniversary of independence

    4) Regarding the imprisonment of four Papuans

    —————————————————————————————



    TUESDAY, 11 AUGUST, 2015 | 19:56 WIB
    1) Govt’ Streamline Entry Permit for Foreign Journalist in Papua  
    TEMPO.COJakarta - Foreign Affairs Minister Retno L.P Marsudi said that her Ministry is planning to streamline the process for foreign journalists wishing to report from Papua. "We will attempt to simplify the matter as much as we can," said Retno on Monday, August 10, 2015.
    According to Retno, there will still be some due processes that journalists must go through prior to the granting of access - not dissimilar to what Indonesian journalists must go through when they wish to report from abroad. "We will apply the same sort of standard," she said.
    Previously, a request made by foreign journalists must be cleared by a Clearing House, which involves elements from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the National Police (POLRI), the State Intelligence Agency (BIN), as well as the Coordinating Ministry for Politics, Law, and Security.
    It is known that President Joko 'Jokowi' Widodo had officially lifted the restrictions during his visit of Merauke on May 10, 2015 - which in essence made Papua as journalist-friendly as the rest of Indonesia.
    For years, journalists who were found to have reported in Papua without an official permit from the Clearing House could face criminal charges - the most recent of which involved two French journalists, Thomas Dandois and Valentina Bourrat, who were arrested when filming a documentary on separatism on Papuan soil.
    According to the Foreign Affairs Ministry's Information and Media Department, as per June 11, 2015, there were eight requests made by foreign journalists to report from Papua - all of which has been approved by the Ministry.
    Prior to 2014, not all requests were granted. In 2012, only five requests have been approved out of the total of 11 that were lodged. In 2013, 28 permits were issued and seven were rejected, while throughout 2014, only five out of the 27 permits lodged were denied.
    MOYANG KASIH DEWIMERDEKA

    —————————————————————————


    For the last five years, the people of Merauke Regency, in Indonesia's southern Papua province, have been resisting a large-scale agriculture project that threatens the livelihoods of more than 50,000 people. Their resistance has effectively slowed the development of the 2.5 million hectares of concessions linked to the “Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate” (MIFEE) project. However, the government has recently announced new and ambitious plans that threaten the food and forests of Merauke's Malind indigenous majority.
    The land allocated to the project – more than 55 per cent of Merauke’s total area – was chosen because the government considers it as “unproductive” and sparsely populated. The vast monoculture agriculture project is in line with a 2008 Presidential Decree on large-scale investment in food and agriculture. Responding to the global food crisis of the time, the government saw the development of large-scale plantations as a way to feed Indonesia's growing population as well as contributing to feeding the world.
     
    MIFEE has been controversial from the start because it will destroy part of the Papuan forest, which is the world’s third largest tropical forest, and threatens the homes, food supply and forests of the indigenous Malind community.
     
    While the stated goal of the project is to produce rice, corn and other food crops intended to ensure national self-sufficiency and reduce food imports, the majority of the location permits covering 1.5 million hectares (a first step to obtaining a concession) issued for Merauke as of 2014 were for crops which are usually exported. Seventeen sugar plantations cover 580,000 hectares; eight oil palm plantations occupy 266,000 hectares; seven industrial tree plantations (mostly of acacia and eucalyptus) cover a total area of 594,000 hectares; and food crops including large rice and cassava farms make up the remaining 70,000 hectares (1).

    MIFEE investment plan map. This map comes from the initial planning documents from 2010. No updated maps have been published since then. Source: Merauke Promotion and Investment Agency (BAPINDA), 2010.
    Strong resistance in Papua and throughout Indonesia has slowed MIFEE’s expansion. But the newly elected President Joko Widodo, better known as Jokowi, announced during a visit to Papua in May 2015 his plans to establish the area as the nation's rice bowl over the next three years. He said that 1.2 million hectares of rice farms would be developed, producing 60 million tonnes of rice annually. He even said the area allocated to MIFEE would be expanded to 4.6 million hectares (2).
     
    That announced figure is clearly impossible, as it would be equal to the total area of Merauke Regency. Even looking at the smaller but still staggering figure of 1.2 million hectares for new rice farms, it is not clear where land would be found in the Regency alongside already existing plantations, community housing areas and the Wasur National Park.
     
    The announcement appears to have been spontaneous. Soon afterwards, a follow-up meeting to work out details was held between representatives of the Merauke Regency administration and agriculture minister Andi Amran Sulaiman. A local newspaper reported that Sulaiman gave the local government authorities only three days to prepare a framework for developing 1.2 million hectares of rice plantations; 250,000 hectares to be developed this year, and another 250,000 hectares every six months thereafter (3).
     
    The central government said it would provide seven trillion rupiah (US$ 534 million) per semester to support the plans. The state-owned fertiliser maker, Pupuk Indonesia, has been given the task of raising the initial amount, which will be used to clear and develop 750,000 hectares of rice fields (4). Another 250,000 hectares will be managed by the Agriculture Ministry and a further 200,000 hectares will be offered to private companies.
     
    President Jokowi was invited to visit Merauke by Medco, which is currently the only company actively experimenting with growing rice agriculture in the area. The company – more usually involved in oil and gas production – is one of the pioneers of MIFEE, but its record so far hasn’t been good. One of its subsidiaries involved in timber extraction, PT Selaras Inti Semesta, became well known as one of the worst companies in the area after it tricked the community of Zanegi into handing over its forest for minimal compensation. Poverty and conflict followed, and the company itself failed to make a profit and was shut down a few years later, but only after destroying a vast swathe of the forest and leaving the villagers with no forest and no income (5).
     
    Other private companies are yet to publicly commit to participating in the programme, although one newspaper report mentions Wilmar International and Sinar Mas as being among the conglomerates that have expressed an interest in investing in the project (6). Both companies are among the largest in the oil palm plantation sector, with the production of palm oil as their core business.
     
    Rice is a staple food for Indonesia’s population and all across Asia and it is mostly produced by small scale farmers. According to Indonesia’s 2013 agriculture survey, there are 14 million rice farming households in the country, more than half of the total of 25 million rural households. The majority are small scale farmers who own less than half a hectare of land (7). Today, small scale peasant agriculture produces nearly all of the 44 million tonnes of rice grown in the country. Developing rice cultivation on the scale announced by Indonesia's president can only be done using large-scale monocultures, with fully mechanised methods and heavy input of agrotoxins. If rice production is centralised in the hands of a few state-owned and private corporations, what will happen to the livelihoods of the country’s millions of rice farmers? The MIFEE project area covers 160 villages in Merauke. For the Papuan people it could mean the loss of their home and territory. It could also endanger their source of food – the staple here is sago rather than rice – and animals from the forest.
     
    A villager from Zanegi reported that since plantations began encroaching on their territory it has become more difficult to find food. In 2013, five children died from malnutrition in one of Medco’s concession areas (8). Writing about Jokowi's relaunch of MIFEE in a local magazine, a Papuan student wrote, “On the issue of his proclamation about rice in Merauke, Jokowi is clearly ignoring the fact that the indigenous people of Papua consume sago and their livelihoods depend on the sago forest. That means that cutting down sago palm trees in order to ensure national food (rice) security is a programme that will make the survival of Merauke’s indigenous people impossible because it will destroy their staple food, sago.” (9)
     
    Jokowi’s plan continues to follow a top down national food and agriculture policy, leaving no room for discussions with communities in Merauke or with Indonesia’s rice farmers in general about what they believe is needed to achieve food sovereignty. Despite the fact that during his election campaign, he talked a lot about food sovereignty. The rhetoric argument of increasing national rice production remains a simple transfer of lands from indigenous peoples to big companies.
     
    With more than 1.5 million hectares of land already occupied by plantations in Merauke Regency, it is not clear where the land being talked about now will be found. The 1.2 million hectares probably refers to land originally earmarked for MIFEE in 2010. If so, it is highly unrealistic to imagine it could be developed within three years. To begin with, permits for oil palm and sugar cane plantations have already been issued for virtually the whole area. Also, in many places, Malind indigenous communities, who have rights over that land clearly stated that they will not surrender any more of their land to corporations.
     
    The initial development of MIFEE has created havoc for the communities and the environment in the area. Expanding the project on such a large scale will only create more pressure for the communities and further destruction of forests. Relaunching MIFEE shows that decades of bad policies in the interest of tycoons and multinational companies to control land and natural resources remains. Enough is enough, it is time to denounce MIFEE and return the land to the Malind people.
     
     
    Selwyn Moran, AwasMIFEE, awasmifee@potager.org
    Kartini Samon, GRAIN, kartini@grain.org
     
    From the World Rainforest Movement's monthly bulletin.
     
    (1) Y.L. Franky, “Yayasan Pusaka”, Presented at limited discussion on Jokowi’s agriculture program, Jakarta, 20 May 2015. Figures are rounded to the nearest thousand hectares.
    (2) “Pemerintah Siapkan Merauke Jadi Lumbung Padi Nasional” (Government prepare Merauke as National Rice Bowl),” Tempo. 11 May 2015.
    (3) “Jokowi relaunches MIFEE, wants 1.2 million hectares of new ricefields within 3 years!” AwasMIFEE, 15 May 2015.
    (4) Damiana Simanjuntak, “Pupuk Indonesia needs $534m for Merauke Food Estate,” Jakarta Post, 18 May 2015.
    (5) “Jokowi relaunches MIFEE, wants 1.2 million hectares of new ricefields within 3 years!” AwasMIFEE, 15 May 2015.
    (6) Idem
    (7) National agriculture census 2013.
    (8) Testimony of Zanegi villager during limited discussion on Jokowi’s agriculture program, Jakarta, 20 May 2015.
    (9) Sanimala Bastian. Majalah Selangkah. Proklamasi Beras, Soal Penjajahan Pangan Indonesia. 13 May 2015.


    ————————————————————————————

    3)  Human rights in Indonesia onjust before the 70th anniversary of independence
    Article by the LP3BH: 9 August 2015

      Since 1969, the Land of Papua has been designated as an autonomous province in accordance with Law 12/1969 and as we approach 17 August,
    2015, we can note that Papua has been an integral part of the Republic of Indonesia for 52 years.

       The autonomous province of Irian Barat was subsequently named the Province of Papua according to Law 21/2001. Then the name was changed
    again to the Province of Papua which was granted the status of special autonomy

      West Papua was subsequently divided into two provinces, the Province of Papua and the Province of West Papua by virtue of Law
    45/1999 which was subsequently amended  by Law 35/2008 according to which they both to become autonomous provinces.
    As the 70th anniversary of the Independence of the Republic of Indonesia approaches, we should make it clear that conditions in both
    provinces are very unsatisfactory and fail to comply with the universal principles of basic human rights.

       Law 12/1999 enacted a decision to hold an Act of Free Choice even though there ere many incidents of violence used despite the enactment
    of Law 26/2000 on Human Rights Courts.   Grave violations of human rights accompanied by acts  of violence occurred during the periods before, during 
    and after the Act of Free
    Choice in a number of cities across West Papua: Merauke, Fakfak,Sorong, Manokwari,Biak, Nabire, Jayapura and Wamena.

       We should also record the fact that there have been numerous occasions when hundreds of Papuans from various sectors of the
    community - school children, students, government employees, employees in the private sector, artists, teachers and spiritual workers  - even
    disappearances- - that occurred in July and August 1969.   Unfortunately, we have to say that nothing has been done during
    the 70 years of Indonesian independence by the Government of Indonesia or the Head of State to take any action in accordance with the
    principles of truth and law to resolve these many cases of grave human rights violations which are widely believed to have been perpetrated
    by members of the security forces (TNI/Polri) during the period from 1963 to 1969.

      Indonesia now has two laws, Law 39/1999 on Basic Human Rights and Law 26/2000 on Human Rights Courts and as well as a National Human
    Rights Commission (KOMNAS-HAM). However, nothing has been done to deal with these infractions in accordance with the laws in force or by 
    those special agencies.     It is widely believed that these violations were perpetrated by  members of the security forces (TNI/POLRI) and yet no one has been
    made accountable.

       In 2001, the Government of Indonesia granted autonomous status to the Province of Papua based on Law 21/2001. One of the purposes of the
    law as stated in the Preamble is that one of the basic problems is that no respect has been shown, nor have people in the Land of Papua
    been guaranteed their basic human rights In this connection, Articles 45 and 46 of Law 21/2001 clarify the
    measures that the administrations of the provinces of Papua and West Papua ought to take to resolve the human rights violations that have
    occurred in the Land of Papua.

      This should have been done by appointing a special representative of KOMNAS-HAM for the Land of Papua, as well as by setting up a Human
    Rights Court and forming a Commission on Truth and Reconciliation (KKR).

       Although a representative of the KOMNAS-HAM for Papua has been appointed  for the Province of Papua, nothing has been done to set up
    a Human Rights Court of the afore-mentioned KKR.    Moreover, during that same period, no measures were taken to
    reinforce the legal powers of the Attorney-General’s Office or the High Attorney in Papua to deal with the many grave violations of human
    rights as required by the laws of this country.  During the same period, nothing has been done to resolve these
    various incidents  when grave human rights violations occurred for fifty years in the Land of Papua.

       Many of these incidents occurred quite recently such as the following: the Bloody Aimas Incident on 30 April 2013, the Wasior
    Incident in June and July 2001, the Bloody Manokwari Incident in September  1999, the Wamena Incident in 2003, along with the incidents
    which occurred  in the Central Highlands (in and around Pyramid) in 1977 and 1978 which are believed to have been genocidal, the Bloody
    Biak Incident on 6 July 1998, the Enarotali -Paniai Incident on 8 December 2014, the Yahukimo Incident, the Kotaraja Incident, the
    Wamena Incident, the Sorong Incident and the mysterious death of Martinus Yohame, (an activist of the National Committee of West Papua,
    KNPB) and the Tolikara Incident on 17 July 2015.

      The KOMNAS-HAM which is an official state agency that has the power to investigate grave human rights violations that occur in Indonesia
    in accordance with the laws in force, is always facing difficulties in taking action in accordance with its official powers to investigate
    every  case  where grave human rights violations are thought to have occurred  in the Land of Papua.

      This is the core of the problem, where grave violations of human rights have occurred as would seem apparent according to the available
    data and reports that have been published in the international media and via the internet as well as in the social media and the mass
    media, yet (pro justitia) investigations are always confronted with a number of difficulties.

       The reason for this is that the State frequently ‘intervenes' using people who do not have the necessary competence or authority as
    stipulated in Law 39/1999 on Basic Human Rights.   What I am referring to is intervention by setting up a 'joint'
    Fact-Finding Team involving the security institutions (TNI/POLRI)  where there is data that suggests that these forces are involved in
    the violations.

       So the question that arises is: how is it possible for those institutions which are strongly believed to have been involved in the
    incidents as the ‘perpetrators' to conduct investigations that would be directed against their own institutions?

      This is why there is a growing mistrust among the Papuan people towards the Indonesian State.in guaranteeing legal protection and
    respect for upholding human rights on Cenderawasih soil.  Besides, all the presidents of Indonesia since the era of
    democracy (since May 1998) such as Susilo Bambang Yodhoyono and Joko Widodo, neither of whom has given assurances in the form of political
    will to uphold the law in cases of human rights violations during this whole period up to the present day.

      This is what has always made it difficult to uphold the law and protect human rights in the Land of Papua ever since its integration
    into Indonesia since it became independent.
    Peace
    Yan Christian Warinussy,
    Executive Director of the LP3BH
    The Institution of Research, Analyzing and /development for Legal Aid.

    Translated by Carmel Budiardjo


    ——————————————————————————————————————

    4) Regarding the imprisonment of four Papuans
    11th August, 2015

      The LP3BH has received a message which states that the term of imprisonment  of four Papuans has been prolonged, which would be in
    violations of the law. The four prisoners are: Alexander Nekenem, Maikel Aso, Narko Murib and Yoram Magai who are being held at the headquarters of the police
    in West Papua. A note from  the chairman of the State Court states
    that they will each spend  an additional thirty days, as decided by the chairman of the State Court in Manokwari, Maryono. SH.

       The thirty-day prolongation will be dated from 3 August until the 1st September and could be further prolonged if this is considered
    necessary by the Attorney. Three of the men - Alexander Nemeken, Maikel Aso and Narko Murib who are clients of the LP3BH. complained that they were feeling unwell
    when one of their lawyers, Theresje Julianty Gasperz was allowed to visit them on Thursday, 6 August at around 11am.

    Peace
    Yan Christian Warinussy, EXecutive Director of the LP3BH, the
    Instution of Research, Analyzing and Development of Legal Rights.
    Translated by Carmel Budiardjo, Recipient of the Right Livelihood Award, 1995

    ————————————————

    0 0

    Mr. Michel Fors, 

    Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders

    United Nations Office at Geneva

    CH 1211 Geneva 10

    Switzerland


    4 August 2015


    I am writing to you on behalf of TAPOL, a UK-based human rights organisation, regarding the ongoing threats faced by prominent human rights defender, Mr Theo Hesegem, in Jayawijaya, West Papua. Mr Theo Hesegem, is the head of the Advocacy Network for Upholding Law and Human Rights of Papua Central Highlands (Jaringan Advokasi Penegakan Hukum dan HAM Pegunungan Tengah Papua, JAPHAM) and the chair of the Coalition Team for Justice, Law and Human Rights of the Central Highlands of Papua (Tim Koalisi untuk Perdamaian, Hukum dan HAM Pengunungan Tengah). Hesegem has recently been subject to various threats in his work as a paralegal assisting victims of human rights violations in Jayawijaya Regency in Papua. Nevertheless, local police have recently restricted his activities as a paralegal and human rights defender and have threatened him for defending victims of human rights violations.


    Mr Hesegem, is currently providing assistance to Mr Roby Pekei, a victim of arbitrary police violence. On 28 July 2015, Hesegem, along with other human rights defenders from the Coalition Team for Justice, Law and Human Rights, accompanied Pekei during a pre-trial hearing in Wamena District Court challenging the unprocedural manner of his arrest and detention. According to information received from the Coalition Team, the pre-trial hearing was attended by dozens of police officers. This heavy security presence was reportedly set up to intimidate the lawyers and paralegals. According to credible sources who attended the pre-trial hearing, police investigators were overheard stating that they “had to kill” Ms Anum Siregar, one of the human rights lawyers accompanying Mr Pekei.


    Several days before the pre-trial hearing, on 22 July, police officers gathered outside the office of the human rights organisation Lotus Heart Forum Foundation (Yayasan Teratai Hati Papua, YTHP), who are also part of the Coalition Team assisting Mr Pekei. Police offices reportedly threatened Father John Jonjonga, the organisations’ director.


    On 4 August, Wamena District Court judges rejected Mr Pekei’s pre-trial plea. Human rights lawyers from the Coalition Team are currently seeking to report this ruling to the National Judicial Commission. In our view, it is likely that human rights defenders accompanying this case will continue to face threats and intimidation from local authorities.


    In 2014, Ms Siregar was stabbed in the hand when she defended a high-profile treason case involving the detention of a Papuan tribal leader in Wamena. In the same year, another prominent human rights lawyer, Mr Gustaf Kawer faced an attempted criminalisation by the courts, intimidation and threat of arrest by police, and was forced to relocate for several months for his own security. In 2012, another human rights lawyer, Ms Olga Hamadi received such extreme threats of physical violence outside courtrooms in Wamena that she was forced to leave town and to drop the case. These cases demonstrate that the situation is deteriorating for human rights defenders in West Papua. West Papua is an extremely dangerous place for HRDs. We are concerned that this pattern will continue to worsen and that their already difficult work to uphold justice in West Papua will be restricted even further if threats and intimidation such as that faced by Mr Hesegem are left unchallenged.


    Facts of the Case


    In May 2015, Mr Theo Hesegem received a threatening text message from an unknown number as well as a threatening phone call from the Chief of the Jayawijaya Regional Police, Grand Commissioner Adjutant Semmy Ronny Tabaa, after he protested the arrest and torture of a local Papan man, Serry Logo. The unknown text message stated “Don’t cry out about the victim or his torture just because you are a human rights defender. You don’t know when your turn will come to be tortured and experience the same misery.” Furthermore, when Hesegem complained about this torture case, the police chief in turn threatened him with torture and demanded that he did not get involved with the case.


    On 21 June 2015, Mr Hesegem was threatened after assisting Roby Erik Pekei, a nursing college student in Jayawijaya who was shot three times in a row on his right ankle, left thigh and left shinbone by Wamena police. While the victim was in critical condition, his family requested for Mr Hesegem to accompany them on a hospital visit.


    During this visit, Mr Hesegem and the family of the victim met with the Deputy Chief of Jayawijaya Police, together with his team members who were guarding the victim that night. Hesegem explained to police that the incident was unacceptable and stated his intention to hold a peaceful demonstration calling for justice. The family members, on the other hand, reprimanded and scolded the police after witnessing Mr Pekei’s critical condition. Responding to this, Mr Hesegem requested for the police to wait outside the emergency room as the victims’ family members were becoming very emotional. A short while later, the Head of Jayawijaya Regional Police, Grand Comissioner Adjutant Semmy Ronny Tabaa, arrived at the hospital and demanded for Mr Hesegem to leave. Almost two weeks later, on 4 July 2015, Tabaa was quoted in an article in local newspaper Cenderawasih Post, referring to the hospital visit on 21 June. He stated that Mr Hesegem was a provocateur who drove policemen out of the hospital that day.


    In another incident, on 28 June 2015, Mr Theo Hesegem was denied access to provide paralegal accompaniment to members of the West Papua National Committee (Komite Nasional Papua Barat, KNPB) who were arrested for planning to hold a peaceful demonstration in Wamena, Jayawijaya regency. Mr Hesegem, along with three other activists were asked to leave by the Jayawijaya police chief. They were driven out for not having lawyer licenses.


    Mr Hesegem states that such pressure, harassment and intimidation has been haunting him and other human rights defenders in Jayawijaya regency. He has requested for intervention to support him in his work as an activist holding authorities to account over human rights violations.


    Petition


    The Former Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders, Ms Hina Jilani, visited Papua in 2007 and stated that the risks faced by human rights defenders in West Papua continued to persist despite assurances by the military commander and the Chief of Police that there were no institutional policies targeting human rights defenders. She has recommended for national mechanisms to improve in order to ensure more credible oversight and accountability. She also recommended the creation of a special complaint mechanism for registering and redressing incidents of harm or threats faced by human rights defenders.


    We therefore, urge you to raise this case with the Indonesian government, requesting that the obligation of the state to protect the security of human rights defenders is upheld. Furthermore, we urge you to conduct in-depth monitoring into the deteriorating situation faced by human rights defenders in West Papua.


    Sincerely yours,


    Esther Cann

    Coordinator, TAPOL



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